Saving Stuff: How to Care for and Preserve Your Collectibles, Heirlooms, and Other Prized Possessions

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Simon and Schuster, Jun 2, 2005 - Antiques & Collectibles - 338 pages
2 Reviews
The most comprehensive book on preserving every type of collectible -- from the sentimental to the valuable -- from the Smithsonian's Senior Conservator.
For both the serious collector and the sometimes sentimentalist, Saving Stuff explains -- in plain language -- how you can use the techniques of museum professionals to keep your prized possessions in mint condition.
You do not need deep pockets or oodles of time: using Don Williams's simple instructions, you can preserve anything quickly and inexpensively. In Saving Stuff, he demystifies preservation and presents easy, foolproof methods anyone can use to save nearly everything, including:
  • Photographs -- in print and digital form
  • Stuff only a parent could love -- from baby teeth to old blankets and first artworks
  • Furniture -- whether it's painted, varnished, or upholstered
  • Family heirlooms -- from silver to rugs to wedding dresses
  • Sports and political memorabilia -- trading cards, posters, equipment, buttons, stickers
  • Attic leftovers -- scrapbooks, military uniforms, medals
  • Musical instruments
  • Fine art -- oil paintings, etchings, lithographs
  • Printed matter -- comic books, magazines, old letters
  • And much, much more

With step-by-step instructions, detailed illustrations, tips for making the things you use every day last, and stories about how the Smithsonian takes care of our national treasures, Saving Stuff is the only book you need to take care of the stuff you love.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bandings - LibraryThing

Every family historian, collector (of anything), packrat, and anyone else who wants to save stuff of any kind will learn from "Saving Stuff". I am all of those: family historian, collector of many ... Read full review

Saving stuff: how to care for and preserve your collectibles, heirlooms, and other prizedpossessions

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

From a fragile antique quilt to a child's macaroni artwork, this book offers expert advice on saving those priceless objects from entropy for the "museum of you." Williams, senior conservator at the ... Read full review

Contents

Your Treasures Want to Live in an Egyptian Tomb
3
Deciding What Stuff to Save Give Away or Toss
14
SAVING FAMILY STUFF
23
Duplication Options
31
Archiving Toys for Young and Old
47
Cleaning Storing and Displaying
57
Leather Dolls
63
Saving the Stuff Only a Parent Could Love
64
Sticks Bats Helmets
152
Preserving Entertainment Memorabilia and Media
155
Audiotapes Cassettes
168
Gramophones Victrolas and Turntables
174
Saving Your Books Comic Books Newspapers
180
Duplicating Fragile Vintage Books
187
Preserving Your Coins and Stamps
201
PRESERVING REALLY VALUABLE STUFF
213

School Papers
72
Saving Your Family Treasures
82
Preserving Your InUse Silver
88
Cleaning Storing and Displaying
94
Metal Chandeliers
100
AntiqueSigns
111
Reptiles and Fish
117
Cleaning
123
GoldPlated Hardware Also Known as Gilt
130
POP CULTURE
139
Oil Paintings
221
Preserving Gilded Frames
227
Taking Care of Textiles
249
Cleaning Antique Upholstery
259
Preserving Draperies and Curtains
270
Preserving Musical Instruments
281
Dons Rules for Bow Care
288
Percussion Instruments
300
Index
331
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Don Williams is Senior Conservator at the Smithsonian Institution. During his career, he has consulted on the preservation of such artifacts as Archie Bunker's chair and Franklin Roosevelt's desk. He has served as Education Coordinator of the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education and led conservation workshops throughout the country. Mr. Williams lives near Washington, D.C.

Louisa Jaggar has been a columnist for Washington Parent and has contributed articles to Diversion and the online site Family Travel Network. She has written for PBS and the University of Chicago, among others. She lives near Washington, D.C.

Bibliographic information