Saving All the Parts: Reconciling Economics And The Endangered Species Act

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Island Press, Aug 1, 1993 - Nature - 280 pages
Saving All the Parts is a journalist's exploration of the intertwining of endangered species protection and the economic future of resource dependent communities -- those with local economies based on fishing, logging, ranching, mining, and other resource intensive industries. Rocky Barker presents an insightful overview of current endangered species controversies and a comprehensive look at the wide-ranging implications of human activities.The book analyzes trends in natural resource management, land use planning, and economic development that can lead to a future where economic activity can be sustained without the loss of essential natural values. Throughout, Barker provides a thorough and balanced analysis of both the ecological and economic forces that affect the lives and livelihoods of the nation's inhabitants -- both human and animal.

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Contents

Troubled Waters
56
Salmon Sacrifice
79
5
109
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Roland "Rocky" Barker was senior reporter in charge of special projects for the Post Register in Idaho Falls, Idaho. In 1990, he led the newspaper's team of reporters, editors, and photographers in presenting an exhaustive study of the Endangered Species Act and its effects on the Pacific Northwest and northern Rockies. The series was a runner-up for the Edward J. Meeman Award, the top environmental journalism award in the country, and winner of numerous state and regional awards. Barker also was lead reporter for the Post Register's award-winning coverage of the 1988 Yellowstone fires and its nationally recognized coverage of nuclear waste problems at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. He holds a bachelor's degree in environmental studies from Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin, and is a fellow of the Knight School of Specialized Journalism at the University of Maryland.

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