Saying It's So: A Cultural History of the Black Sox Scandal

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University of Illinois Press, Oct 1, 2010 - Sports & Recreation - 304 pages
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The story of "Shoeless" Joe Jackson and his teammates purportedly conspiring with gamblers to throw the World Series to the Cincinnati Reds has lingered in our collective consciousness for more than eighty years. Daniel A. Nathan's wide-ranging, interdisciplinary cultural history is less concerned with the details of the scandal than with how it has been represented and remembered by journalists, historians, novelists, filmmakers, and baseball fans. Saying It's So offers a series of astute reflections on what these different cultural narratives reveal about their creators and the eras in which they were created, producing a complex study of cultural values, memory, and the ways people make meaning.
 
A volume in the series Sport and Society, edited by Benjamin G. Rader and Randy Roberts
 
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
News Narrative and the Black Sox Scandal
11
The Black Sox Scandal and American Collective Memories
58
Bernard Malamuds The Natural and Eliot Asinofs Eight Men Out
92
Illustrations follow page 118
118
Historians Take a Swing at the Black Sox Scandal
119
Retelling the Black Sox Scandal in the Eighties
149
The Black Sox Scandal at the End of the Twentieth Century
190
Conclusion
217
Notes
223
Index
277
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Daniel A. Nathan is an associate professor of American Studies at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York.

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