Sayings, Wise and Otherwise

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American Book Exchange, 1880 - American wit and humor - 265 pages
 

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Page 257 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 178 - QUEEN and huntress, chaste and fair, Now the sun is laid to sleep, Seated in thy silver chair, State in wonted manner keep: Hesperus entreats thy light, Goddess, excellently bright!
Page 178 - Seated in thy silver chair State in wonted manner keep: Hesperus entreats thy light, Goddess excellently bright. Earth, let not thy envious shade Dare itself to interpose; Cynthia's shining orb was made Heaven to clear when day did close: Bless us then with wished sight, Goddess excellently bright. Lay thy bow of pearl apart And thy crystal-shining quiver; Give unto the flying hart Space, to breathe, how short soever: Thou that mak'st a day of night, Goddess excellently bright.
Page 176 - I suppose there be some; Sure they will not let young men stand on the cold stone! Sing hey O, maids ! come trole back the pin, And the fairest maid in the house let us all in. Come, butler, come, bring us a bowl of the best; I hope your soul in heaven...
Page 28 - Harry is valiant ; for the cold blood he did naturally inherit of his father, he hath, like lean, sterile, and bare land, manured, husbanded, and tilled, with excellent endeavour of drinking good and good store of fertile sherris, that he is become very hot and valiant. If I had a thousand sons, the first human principle I would teach them should be, — to forswear thin potations, and to addict themselves to sack.
Page 176 - Wassail! Wassail! all over the town, Our toast it is white, our ale it is brown: Our bowl it is made of a maplin tree; We be good fellows all: I drink to thee.
Page 190 - It ascends me into the brain ; dries me there all the foolish and dull and crudy vapours which environ it ; makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble fiery and delectable shapes; which, delivered o'er to the voice, the tongue, which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.
Page 177 - My faultless breast the furnace is, the fuel wounding thorns; Love is the fire, and sighs the smoke, the ashes shame and scorns; The fuel justice layeth on, and mercy blows the coals; The metal in this furnace wrought are men's defiled souls: For which, as now on fire I am to work them to their good, So will I melt into a bath to wash them in my blood.
Page 175 - ... room for the Bouncing Belly, First father of sauce, and deviser of jelly ; Prime master of arts, and the giver of wit, That found out the excellent engine the spit; The plough and the flail, the mill and the hopper, The hutch and the boulter, the furnace and copper, The oven, the baven, the mawkin, the peel, The hearth and the range, the dog and the wheel...
Page 177 - The burning babe As I in hoary winter's night stood shivering in the snow, Surprised I was with sudden heat which made my heart to glow; And lifting up a fearful eye to view what fire was near, A pretty babe all burning bright did in the air appear; Who, scorched with excessive heat, such floods of tears did shed As though his floods should quench his flames which with his tears were fed. Alas...

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