Scaling Up, Scaling Down: Overcoming Malnutrition in Developing Countries

Front Cover
Thomas J. Marchione
Taylor & Francis, 1999 - Social Science - 292 pages
The individual and institutional capacities required for the prevention and reduction of nutritional insecurity and hunger in lesser-developed countries as the twenty-first century approaches are identified in this book. Household nutritional "security" can be defined as the successful
The essays in this book champion the idea of increasing, or scaling up, grass roots operations to provide nutritional security, while scaling down the efforts of national and international institutions. Scaling up involves strengthening local capacities to improve and expand upon current successful programs by building upon existing local culture and organizations. This, in turn, enables the programs to strengthen relationships with national governments, international bilateral/multilateral donors, as well as non-governmental organizations. Scaling down concerns the ways and means by which these various organizations encourage and complement the local development. Therefore, as local capacities are scaled up, the national/international control over decisions and functions is, ideally, scaled down. The volume also directly addresses the resultant complication: how to create programs that are both culturally specific and that will flourish well into the future.
 

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Contents

The Master Key to Child Survival
23
How Did We Get Here? A History of International Nutrition
41
The Culture of Nutrition Practice in a New Development
49
NGO Paths to Overcoming Hunger
71
Scaling Up a Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition Program
97
Mothers Help
119
A Community
139
An NGOs Search for Program Sustainability
157
Reflections on an Application
227
Improving the Practice
243
Conclusions
269
Index
285
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