Scalp Dance: Indian Warfare on the High Plains, 1865-1879

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Stackpole Books, 1997 - History - 340 pages
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Some of the most savage war in world history was waged on the American Plains from 1865 to 1879. As settlers moved west following the Civil War, they found powerful Indian tribes barring the way. When the U.S. Army intervened, a bloody and prolonged conflict ensued.

Drawing heavily from diaries, letters, and memoirs from American Plains settlers, historian Thomas Goodrich weaves a spellbinding tale of life and death on the prairie, told in the timeless words of the participants themselves. Scalp Dance is a powerful, unforgettable epic that shatters modern myths. Within its pages, the reader will find a truthful account of Indian warfare as it occurred.

 

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Scalp dance: Indian warfare on the high plains, 1865-1879

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Goodrich, whose previous books, Black Flag (LJ 2/15/95) and Bloody Dawn (LJ 1/1/91), told of Civil War-era Kansas, weaves various firsthand narratives into this account focusing on two episodes of ... Read full review

Contents

PrologueNovember 29 1864
1
Thicker Than Fiddlers in Hell
7
A Perfect Silence
21
The Last Bullet
35
The Man The Monster The War
47
One Equals One
61
More Tears Than Dollars
77
Island in the Sand
93
A Lease on Hell
181
The Girl I Left Behind Me
197
Red is the Rosebud
215
Garry Owen in Glory
233
Death Song
265
Bloody Road Back
295
Epilogue
307
Notes
311

A Fate Worse Than Death
115
Old Men Laugh
131
If I Were an Indian
159
Bibliography
329
Index
336
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Page x - Warriors, women, and children swarmed like bees ; hundreds of dogs, of all sizes and colors, ran restlessly about ; and, close at hand, the wide shallow stream was alive with boys, girls, and young squaws, splashing, screaming, and laughing in the water. At the same time a long train of emigrants with their heavy wagons was crossing the creek, and dragging on in slow procession by the encampment of the people whom they and their descendants, in the space of a century, are to sweep from the face of...
Page x - Indian wars as have hitherto disturbed the public peace and tranquillity are not probable. The Army has been a large factor in producing this result, but it is not the only one. Immigration and the occupation by industrious farmers and miners of...

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About the author (1997)

Thomas Goodrich is a professional writer whose focus is the American West. He is a native Kansan and lives near Topeka.

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