Scarlet Sister Mary

Front Cover
University of Georgia Press, Oct 1, 1998 - Fiction - 376 pages
3 Reviews
Julia Peterkin pioneered in demonstrating the literary potential for serious depictions of the African American experience. Rejecting the prevailing sentimental stereotypes of her times, she portrayed her black characters with sympathy and understanding, endowing them with the full dimensions of human consciousness. In these novels and stories, she tapped the richness of rural southern black culture and oral traditions to capture the conflicting realities in an African American community and to reveal a grace and courage worthy of black pride.
 

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User Review  - mikedraper - LibraryThing

This is a book that won the 1929 Pulitzer Prize in fiction. It tells the story of Southern Life and describes the life of Mary who still lives in the Blue Brook Plantation. She doesn't have any memory ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - agnesmack - LibraryThing

I didn't dislike this book but it was a bit of a chore to get through. It told the tale of a black community trying to figure out their new freedom. It followed the life of Sister Mary and her dozen ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

CHAPTER I
12
CHAPTER II
15
CHAPTER III
26
CHAPTER IV
45
CHAPTER V
51
CHAPTER VI
60
CHAPTER VII
67
CHAPTER VIII
72
CHAPTER XVIII
188
CHAPTER XIX
200
CHAPTER XX
209
CHAPTER XXI
218
CHAPTER XXII
254
CHAPTER XXIII
266
CHAPTER XXIV
277
CHAPTER XXV
285

CHAPTER IX
79
CHAPTER X
95
CHAPTER XI
103
CHAPTER XII
120
CHAPTER XIII
131
CHAPTER XIV
151
CHAPTER XV
171
CHAPTER XVI
176
CHAPTER XVII
183
CHAPTER XXVI
290
CHAPTER XXVII
300
CHAPTER XXVIII
304
CHAPTER XXIX
318
CHAPTER XXX
328
CHAPTER XXXI
333
CHAPTER XXXII
340
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Page xxviii - ... facts on which they are based had crystallized in my consciousness and had to be given form. In Black April incidents are blended together, of course, in the hope of achieving continuity. . . . When you are writing out of your experience you don't have to rely to any great extent upon your imagination. I have lived among the negroes. I like them. They are my friends, and I have learned so much from them.
Page xxx - American novel that best presents "the wholesome atmosphere of American life, and the highest standards of American manners and manhood.
Page xxiii - Mary had a brave heart. She had done well in her first trial at birthing a child. A woman with plenty of experience could have done no better. God must have blessed her with the same wisdom he gave to the beasts, who know well when the time comes to birth their young, and instead of complaining of God's ways, as people do, go off alone without a word, and struggle with their labor as best they can. So many women who are made in the image of God himself, lie down helpless, full of groans and bitter...
Page xxxv - Grant Overton, The Women Who Make Our Novels (New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1928), 259-60.

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About the author (1998)

Julia Peterkin (1880-1961) was the author of three novels, a collection of short stories, and, with photographer Doris Ulmann, a nonfiction collection of essays entitled Roll, Jordan, Roll. She was the first South Carolinian to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

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