Scenes and Studies of Savage Life

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Smith, Elder and Company, 1868 - Indians of North America - 317 pages
 

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Page 187 - tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed worldly life, ^ That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death.
Page 100 - being fully aroused, he often shows much quickness ' in reply and ingenuity in argument. But a short ' conversation wearies him, particularly if questions are ' asked that require efforts of thought or memory on...
Page 100 - The native mind, to an educated man, seems generally to be asleep. * * * On his attention being fully aroused, he often shows much quickness in reply and ingenuity in argument. But a short conversation wearies him, particularly if questions are asked that require efforts of thought or memory on his part. The niind of the savage then appears to rock to and fro out of mere weakness.
Page 46 - The Indian singer often acts while he sings or dances, representing at the same time a certain scene from life. Sproat describes one of those dances, where a man appears with his arms tied behind his back with long cords, the ends of which are held by other natives, who drive him about. The spectators sing and beat time on their wooden dishes and bearskin drums. Suddenly the chief appears, and plunges his knife into the runner's back. Another blow is given, a third one, until the blood flows down...
Page 49 - After this a pail of vvater was brought in, and the doctor, who supported the dying man on his arm, washed the blood from his face; the people beat drums, danced, and sang, and suddenly the patient sprang to his feet and joined in the dance, none the worse for the apparently hopeless condition of the moment before. While all this was going on, I asked the giver of the feast whether it was real blood upon the man's face, and if he were really wounded. He told me so seriously that it was, that I was...
Page 185 - ... details of their theology. They try to hide from the prying and contemptuous foreigner their worship of gods ^who seem to shrink, like their worshippers, before the white man and his mightier Deity. Mr Sproat's experience in Vancouver's Island is an apt example of this state of things. He says : ' I was two years among the Ahts, with my mind constantly directed towards the subject of their religious beliefs, before I could discover that they possessed any ideas as to an overruling power or a...
Page 74 - Indians of Vancouver Island, when girls reach puberty they are placed in a sort of gallery in the house " and are there surrounded completely with mats, so that neither the sun nor any fire can be seen. In this cage they remain for several days. Water is given them, but no food. The longer a girl remains in this retirement the greater honour is it to the parents ; but she is disgraced for life if it is known that she has seen fire or the sun during this initiatory ordeal.
Page 252 - They had heard it said, and they were fearful words, that it was the law of nature that the coloured races should melt away before the advance of civilization. He would tell them where that law was registered, and who were its agents. It was registered in hell, and its agents were those whom Satan made twofold more the children of hell than himself.
Page 78 - The Ahts consider it a point of honour that the purchase-money given for a woman of rank shall, some time or other, be returned in a present of equal value.2 Similar statements are made with reference to the Patagonians,3 Mishmis,4 and certain tribes in the Indian Archipelago.5 Among the Bagobos of the Philippines, if the newly-married couple are satisfied with each other, the father of...

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