Little Grace, Or, Scenes in Nova-Scotia

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Published and sold by C. MacKenzie & Company, 1846 - Nova Scotia - 178 pages
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"The auhtor's pedagogical intention is wrapped in a lively family story. As the engagingly curious young heroine, Grace Severn, learns of the particular history, geography, and botany of the colony, she and her reader alike gain an awareness of and sympathy for its diverse population, including Mi'kmaq peoples, Acadian settlers, and African-American slaves and Loyalists, and the role in the settlement of Nova Scotia."--Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Picturing Canada, p. 21.
 

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Page 171 - When the traveler lingers along the way, When the sod is sprinkled with tender green Where rivulets water the earth, unseen, When the floating fringe on the maple's crest Rivals the tulip's crimson vest, And the budding leaves of the...
Page 49 - I've heard of fearful winds and darkness that come there; The little brooks that seem all pastime and all play, When they are angry, -roar like lions for their prey.
Page 171 - And the budding leaves of the birch-trees throw A trembling shade on the turf below ; When my flower awakes from its dreamy rest, And yields its lips to the sweet southwest, Then, in those beautiful days of spring, With hearts as light as the...
Page 50 - Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent, and the whirlwind's roar, But bind him to his native mountains more.
Page 180 - AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 MOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. r...
Page 171 - ... awakes from its dreamy rest And yields its lips to the sweet south-west, Then, in those beautiful days of spring, With hearts as light as the wild-bird's wing, Flinging their tasks and their toys aside, Gay little groups through the wood-paths glide. Peeping and peering among the trees As they scent its breath on the passing breeze, Hunting about among lichens grey And the tangled mosses beside the way, Till they catch the glance of its quiet eye Like light that breaks through a cloudy sky. For...
Page 97 - English in order to attract their attention to him, and thus screen his flock by the volunG tary offer of his own life. As soon as he was discovered, he was saluted by a shout and a shower of bullets, and fell, together with seven Indians, who had rushed out of their tents to shelter him with their bodies, at the foot of a cross which he had erected in the middle of the village.
Page 175 - May flower starts, Where the wild wood bird darts, Queen of our willing hearts, We place thy throne. Ye spirits of the Spring, Fresh from the mountains bring Bright bud and flower ; Weave a rich diadem Of leaf and branch and stem, And with fair blossoms gem Our festive bower. Then, while the rose leaves press The brow of loveliness, Then be ye nigh ! Let your pale shadows pass Quick o'er the rustling gras!>, O'er the stream's polished glass, Glide gently by.
Page 97 - Charlevoix informs us that the Pere Ralle, though unprepared was not intimidated, and advanced towards the English in order to attract their attention to him, and thus screen his flock by the voluntary offer of his own life. As soon as he was discovered, he was saluted by a shout and a shower of bullets...

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