School, College and Character

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Houghton Mifflin and Company, 1901 - Character - 148 pages
 

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Page 92 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Page 65 - IN that day shall this song be sung in the land of Judah ; We have a strong city ; salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks. Open ye the gates, that the righteous nation which keepeth the truth may enter in.
Page 48 - TO THE TERRESTRIAL GLOBE BY A MISERABLE WRETCH ROLL on, thou ball, roll on ! Through pathless realms of Space Roll on! What, though I'm in a sorry case? What, though I cannot meet my bills? What, though I suffer toothache's ills ? What, though I swallow countless pills? Never you mind ! Roll on!
Page 5 - When Jacob saw his Rachel with the sheep, He did at the same time both kiss and weep. Whereas some say, A cloud is in his head ; That doth but show his wisdom's covered With its own mantle.
Page 119 - I will tell you, gentle- [800 men, what has been the practical error of the last twenty years, — not to load the memory of the student with a mass of undigested knowledge, but to force upon him so much that he has rejected all. It has been the error of distracting and enfeebling the mind by an unmeaning profusion of subjects; of implying that a smattering in a dozen branches of study is not shallowness, which it really is, but en- [810 largement, which it is not...
Page 69 - ... is sometimes called; which haunts the home where it has been born, and which imbues and forms, more or less, and one by one, every individual who is successively brought under its shadow. Thus it is that, independent of direct instruction on the part of Superiors, there is a sort of self-education in the academic institutions of Protestant England; a characteristic tone of thought, a recognized standard of judgment is found in them, which as developed in the individual who is submitted to it,...
Page 119 - Learning is to be without exertion, without attention, without toil ; without grounding, without advance, without finishing. There is to be nothing individual in it ; and this, forsooth, is the wonder of the age.
Page 68 - I am but saying that that youthful community will constitute a whole, it will embody a specific idea, it will represent a doctrine, it will administer a code of conduct, and it will furnish principles of thought and action. It will give birth to a living teaching, which in course of time will take the shape of a selfperpetuating tradition, or a genius loci, as it is sometimes called ; which haunts the home where it has been born, and which imbues and forms, more or less, and one by one, every individual...
Page 124 - But the intellect, which has been disciplined to the perfection of its powers, which knows, and thinks while it knows, which has learned to leaven the dense mass of facts and events with the elastic force of reason, such an intellect cannot be partial, cannot be exclusive, cannot be impetuous, cannot be at a loss, cannot but be patient, collected, and majestically calm, because it discerns the end in every beginning, the origin in every end, 20 the law in every interruption, the limit in each delay...
Page 93 - I call a complete and generous education," says Milton, "that which fits a man to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.

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