The Schoolmaster

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Heinemann, 1997 - Teachers - 187 pages
2 Reviews
CXC Prescribed Text for English BIn Kumaca, a remote Trinidadian village, life follows the same pattern from one generation to the next. Paulaine Dandrade wants to see progress, and helps to persuade the other villagers to build a school. But he never i
 

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I had to study this novel for the then CXC examination. This book was very well written, especially the literary devices used to illustrate the story. The themes were very interesting and well put together. Mr. Lovelace is one of my favourite authors. With each line, paragraph, page I read I could have created the images of the story, in my mind. I love this book. Thumbs up. 

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hard to read.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
17
Section 3
32
Section 4
38
Section 5
43
Section 6
45
Section 7
53
Section 8
55
Section 16
100
Section 17
117
Section 18
130
Section 19
134
Section 20
141
Section 21
142
Section 22
154
Section 23
155

Section 9
64
Section 10
69
Section 11
78
Section 12
82
Section 13
90
Section 14
91
Section 15
97
Section 24
159
Section 25
162
Section 26
166
Section 27
180
Section 28
181
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About the author (1997)

EARL LOVELACE was born in Toco, Trinidad in 1935, and spent his childhood in Tobago and Port of Spain. His first job was as a proof reader with the Trinidad Publishing Company, and he later joined the Civil Service, serving first in the Forestry Department and then in the Department of Agriculture.His first novel, While Gods Are Falling, won him the BP Independence Literary Award which enabled him to study in the United States as visiting novelist at Howard University, Washington. It was followed by The Schoolmaster, a novel which drew on his experiences of rural Trinidad. The promise evident in these novels of the sixties was fulfilled in The Dragon Can't Dance, and The Wine of Astonishment which, West Africa magazine argued, 'put him in the front rank of Caribbean writers'. It was followed by a collection of plays, Festina's Calypso, which was published in 1984.

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