Science, Technology, and the Economy: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Development of the Committee on Science and Astronautics, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-third Congress, Second Session. February 19, 20, 21, 1974

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 15 - ... particularly among the owners and masters of steamboats.69 It checked the steady rise in the construction of new boats, which had been characteristic of the earlier years.70 The effect, however, was chastening rather than emasculating. Associations for the prevention of steam boiler explosions were formed; later, insurance companies were organized to insure steam equipment that was manufactured and operated with the utmost regard for safety. In time, through the agency of the American Society...
Page 64 - ... of a trifling tip. The Amauraths and their great chief would get the rich fees. If we judge by appearances it seems that states come in the same category; and it is certainly true that a people in its entirety will often act more blindly than a select class would ever do in a private capacity. Yet there is every reason why a state should make use of forethought. A century is as nothing in its life; and yet how many acts do legislatures, congresses, and parliaments pass for the benefit of coming...
Page 56 - A Theoretical Note on the Capacity of the Market System to Abate Pollution," 45 Land Economics, August 1969, pp.
Page 43 - See below, esp. pp. 342-3. of which time scarcely modifies, when he wrote : " Coals are a less agreeable fuel than wood : they are said to be less wholesome. The expense of coals, therefore, at the place where they are consumed, must generally be somewhat less than that of...
Page 59 - ... crises" teach us that there is no reason to believe that we face long-term doom. If technology were suddenly frozen, some of the dire projections being made now might be realized in several hundred years or less, depending on which "expert" of the week one believes. But technology is not frozen, it is instead progressing at a rate unprecedented in history. The Petroleum Age will pass as did the Stone Age. The real danger is that we may foolishly restrict the exploitation of current resources,...
Page 24 - In 1876 she was elected a corresponding member of the New York Academy of Sciences and a member of the American Chemical Society of New York.
Page 66 - A policy for the growth of metropolitan areas should examine the carrying capacity of various environments across the country in an effort to determine whether a more optimum population distribution is desirable and feasible. If it were determined that a metropolitan growth strategy is desirable, an assessment should be made of such tools as preference for Federal contracts, water resource projects, transportation facilities, and the like.
Page 59 - ... prices for whale oil gave an impetus to seek out and perfect alternative energy sources. The end product of this process of discovery and innovation is the Petroleum Age in which we live. We owe the benefits and comforts of this age to free enterprise and the scarcity of whales. The history of our first "energy crisis" and hundreds of thousands of other "crises" teach us that there is no reason to believe that we face long-term doom. If technology were suddenly frozen, some of the dire projections...
Page 56 - A Reconsideration of Advertising Expenditures. Aggregate Demand, and Economic Stabilization," Quarterly Review of Economics and Business, 9 (1969), 71-77.

Bibliographic information