Scientific Authority & Twentieth-century America

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Ronald G. Walters
JHU Press, 1997 - 271 lappuses

Turn-of-the-century Americans strongly believed that science -- "disinterested" and authoritative -- could help them to organize society and understand the natural world. Yet today, even scientists themselves are raising disturbing questions about the nature and practice of science. In Scientific Authority and Twentieth-Century America Ronald G. Walters brings together a distinguished group of contributors to reflect, often critically, on scientific and medical claims to moral, social, and political authority. Writing from a variety of perspectives -- intellectual history, social history, feminist theory, philosophy, medical history, political theory, and visual analysis -- the authors demonstrate that science no longer belongs exclusively to its practitioners or to any particular discipline.

 

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Saturs

Uncertainty Science and Reform
1
Voices of Authority
11
A Historians View of American Social Science
32
Medical Models
51
in TwentiethCentury America
82
Female Science and Medical Reform A Path Not Taken
99
Selling Science
117
Corporate Science on Display
148
Closing the Circle
183
Notes
205
List of Contributors
261
Autortiesības

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Par autoru (1997)

Ronald G. Walters is a professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of American Reformers: 1815-1860 and The Antislavery Appeal: American Abolitionism after 1830 and editor of Primers for Prudery: Sexual Advice to Victorian America and A Black Woman's Odyssey: The Narrative of Nancy Prince.

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