Scientific Christianity: A Study in the Biology of Character

Front Cover
Moffat, Yard, 1917 - Religion and science - 289 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 83 - have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week ; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through use. The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to the intellect, and more probably to the moral character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.
Page 49 - be filled by a pint. Iron is essentially the same everywhere and always ; but the sulphate of iron is never the same as the carbonate of iron. Truth is invariable ; but the Smithate of truth must always differ from the Brownate of truth.
Page 187 - not only how many instances there are of hereditary talents, etc. But how many instances there are of such qualities not being hereditary. Until something of this sort is attempted we can know nothing about the matter
Page 175 - the objective world. Its media of observation are the five physical senses. It is the outgrowth of man's physical necessities. It is his guide in his struggle with his material environment. Its highest function is that of reasoning.
Page 187 - there are a sufficient number of empirical coincidences to make a plausible case in favour of whatever view a man chooses to advocate. But this is not the way in which
Page 82 - they may contain), and essays on all sorts of subjects interest me as much as ever they did. My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts, but why this should have caused the atrophy of that part of the brain alone, on which the higher tastes depend, I cannot conceive ... if I had to live my life again, I would
Page 175 - The SUBJECTIVE MIND takes cognisance of its environment by means independent of the physical senses. It perceives by intuition. It is the seat of the emotions, and the storehouse of memory. It performs its highest functions when the objective senses are in abeyance. In a word, it is that intelligence which makes itself manifest in a hypnotic subject when he is in a state of somnambulism
Page 18 - This is the Catholic Faith ; which except a man believe faithfully, he cannot be saved.
Page 19 - which except every one do keep whole and undefiled, without doubt he shall perish everlastingly,
Page 82 - aesthetic tastes is all the odder, as books on history, biographies, and travels (independently of any scientific facts they may contain), and essays on all sorts of subjects interest me as much as ever they did. My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts, but why this should have caused the atrophy

Bibliographic information