Scientific and Industrial Education in the United States: An Address Delivered Before the New York State Agricultural Society

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Page 12 - The lecturer for this general purpose is John Stanton Gould. . . . But suppose that no young men came forward to take agricultural studies, the new education would still tell powerfully on agriculture. Think you that we can send out year after year— as we did last year— a hundred graduates from all our various departments, whose powers of observation have been trained and whose real knowledge of subjects bearing on agriculture has been extended by close study in Botany, Animal Physiology, Geology,...
Page 26 - It is just what is wanted by the curious and progressive mind of this country, and ought to be widely circulated."— New York Evening Post. u It is the first successful attempt in this country to popularize science in the pages of a monthly.
Page 20 - ... access to the best thoughts of the best thinkers— the study of the great languages and Literature does this— and especially is it done by the study of this wonderful language and literature of our own. Another most important means of discipline and culture is to be found in the study of the Natural Sciences. On these much of industrial and general progress depends. They discipline the power of observation, and reasoning upon observation. They give, too, a culture to the sense of beauty in...
Page 26 - S . 77u* periodical was started (in 1872) to promote the diffusion of valuable scientific knowledge, in a readable and attractive form, among all classes of the community, and. has thus far met a want supplied by no other magazine in the United States.
Page 20 - Hence the necessity of blending into the various special courses certain general studies calculated to give breadth and foresight and insight. Among these I name, first, instruction in History and Political Science. On this subject, the "new education" lays stress, and especially on the history of our own race and country. The subject has been sadly neglected; but more and more it is seen that, to train men to build up the future, we must show them with what successes and failures their predecessors...
Page 17 - ... at the census, and you will see how wretchedly you are mistaken. The value of the mining products in New York in 1870 was more than half that of the entire gold product of California. Here, too, we must follow up the good work, begun by our Chandlers and Raymonds. Look next at Chemistry applied to Manufactures. More and more the chemical laboratory is becoming a great central point in industrial education. Run over but two or three points out of many. A chemical discovery in coloringmatter has...
Page 26 - The great feature of the magazine is, that its contents are not what science was ten or more years since, but what it is to-day, fresh from the study, the laboratory, and the experiment: clothed in the language of the authors, inventors, and scientists themselves, which comprise the leading minds of England, France, Germany, and the...
Page 22 - Why concentrate your resources in one institution?" I answer, because that is the only way in which you can ever have the work done. To erect, equip and maintain laboratories, work-shops, farms, collections, libraries, observatories— all this demands great sums. To have such institutions, you must pay the price. While the rule, as already stated, regarding preliminary public instruction, is to distribute resources, the rule in regard to advanced education —scientific, general, or industrial—...
Page 23 - Its roots are firm, for they take fast hold upon the strongest material necessities of our land; its trunk is thrifty, for it is fed by the most vitalizing currents of thought which sweep through our time; nay, the very blasts of opposition to this growth have but strengthened it; the winter of discontent through which it has passed has but toughened it; and in agriculture and every branch of industry; in every science and art which ministers to either; in all the development of human thought which...
Page 22 - ... the student in science and industry the equal of the student in classics. We stand against any separation which shall serve to perpetuate that old subordination of men in the new education to men in the old. But it is objected that the new system does not provide for mental discipline. Never was charge more absurd. Discipline comes by studies that take hold of a man and of which he takes hold. Is it not evident that the new system, which adapts studies to the tastes and aims of men, is more sure...

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