Scribes, Sages, and Seers: The Sage in the Eastern Mediterranean World

Front Cover
Leo G. Perdue
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2008 - History - 344 pages
Interest in literature on wisdom derived from Israel and ancient Middle Eastern cultures has increased considerably in recent decades. Research findings from archaeological, theological, and cultural studies illustrate how sages decisively shaped the literature and language of a culture. Their influence extended to the arts, social and religious institutions, and the sciences. In ancient Israel and Judah, the Middle East , and in the Greco-Roman Empire, sages, similar to priests, prophets, and kings, made up their own social class. The essays in this volume examine this particular group of wise men in context of their time. Unlike other studies, the focus here lies in the social aspect of this caste of sages.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

SCRIBES SAGES AND SEERS IN ANCIENT EGyPT
35
IN ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA
47
Tales of Two Sages Towards an Image of the Wise Man
64
SCRIBES SAGES AND SEERS IN UGARIT AND SyRIA
95
Ahikar
109
SCRIBES SAGES AND SEERS
125
The Authors of Job and Their Historical and Social Setting
145
Wisdom as a Hermeneutical Key to the Book of Psalms
154
The Sociological Significance of the Scribe as the Teacher
218
SCRIBES SAGES AND SEERS IN THE GREEK
245
Seers as Mantic Sages in Jewish Apocalyptic Daniel and Enoch
258
Sages and Scribes in the Qumran Literature
271
SCRIBES SAGES AND SEERS
295
Contributors
320
Index of Pseudepigrapha NonBiblical Ancient Literature
331
Author Index
339

Ezra Priest and Scribe
163
The Social World of Ecclesiastes
189

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information