Searching for Intruders: A Novel in Stories

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Harper Collins, Jan 7, 2003 - Fiction - 256 pages
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Stephen Raleigh Byler unveils in eleven stories the evolving self-awareness of Wilson Hues, a hapless drifter in rural Pennsylvania who finds himself, in strange moments of illumination, obsessed with the consequences of his own action and inaction.

Hues gets caught in the throes of a male-dominated and sometimes violent home life and subculture. His dark memories -- rendered in vignettes between stories that serve as a backdrop for his everyday life -- intrude upon his relationships with both men and women in such a way as to remind him of his own tenderness and weakness.

Evocative and exuberant, visceral and reflective, Searching for Intruders is a celebration of life in all of its beauty and pain.

 

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Searching for intruders: a novel in stories

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Byler's first novel is a series of linked stories narrated by Wilson Hues, a Holden Caulfield type in his mid-30s who works minimum-wage jobs and drifts aimlessly from place to place. Hues has seen ... Read full review

Contents

UHaul 3
v
Listle League 3 I
31
Floating
45
Shooting Heads
88
Down Again
173
Barbecue
195
Deer
225
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Stephen Raleigh Byler, whose grandparents were Amish, was born in a small town in the Pennsylvania Dutch country near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He earned an M.A. in religion and literature from Yale University and an MFA in fiction writing from Columbia University. In addition to writing and editing for numerous small magazines, Byler has worked as a radio announcer, a bankruptcy counselor, and a guide at a fly-fishing lodge. He divides his time between Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Livingston, Montana. He is thirty-one years old.

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