Sectarian School-books: A Series of Letters

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A. Mudge & Son, Printers, 1889 - Indulgences - 337 pages
 

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Page 78 - Paul, and of the most holy pope, granted and committed to me in these parts, do absolve thee ; first, from all ecclesiastical censures, in whatever manner they have been incurred ; and, then, from all thy sins, transgressions, and excesses, how enormous soever they may be; even from...
Page 221 - ... parties would meet in the cabins to recite the chaplet, in alternate choirs, and sing psalms into the night. Their psalms were often homilies, with the words set to familiar tunes. Saturday and Sunday were the days appointed for confession and communion, and every convert confessed once in a fortnight.
Page 78 - ... and as far as the keys of the holy church extend, I remit to you all punishment which you deserve in purgatory on their account ; and I restore you to the holy sacraments of the church, to the unity of the faithful, and to that innocence and purity which you possessed at baptism ; so that, when you die, the gates of punishment shall be shut, and the gates of the paradise of delight shall be opened; and if you shall not die at present, this grace shall remain in full force when you are at the...
Page 77 - May our Lord Jesus Christ have mercy upon thee, and absolve thee by the merits of his most holy passion. And I, by his authority, that of his blessed apostles, Peter and Paul, and of the most holy pope, granted and committed to me in these parts, do absolve thee, first from all ecclesiastical censures, in whatever manner they have been incurred ; then from all thy sins, transgressions, and...
Page 229 - But their toleration was accounted to them for a crime. The Puritan party were their sworn foes, and candid Mr. Bancroft says, "had neither the gratitude to respect the rights of the government by which they had been received and fostered, nor magnanimity to continue the toleration to which alone they were indebted for their residence in the colony ; " for the furthest reach of their toleration when they came into power was to " confirm the freedom of conscience, provided the liberty were not extended...
Page 225 - I hope ever to see America among the foremost nations in examples of justice and liberality ; and I presume that your fellow-citizens will not forget the patriotic part which you took in the accomplishment of their revolution and the establishment of their government, or the important assistance which they received from a nation in which the Roman Catholic faith is professed.
Page 65 - These indulgences were, in the early ages of the Church, remissions of the penances imposed upon persons whose sins had brought scandal on the community. But in process of time, they were represented as actual pardons of guilt, and the purchaser of indulgences was said to be delivered from all his sins.
Page 77 - Luther, this abuse had rankled in the heart of Christendom. It was in vain for the Church to assert that, rightly understood, indulgences only released from temporal penances; that they were a commutation, a merciful, lawful commutation for such penances. The language of the promulgators and vendors of the indulgences, even of the indulgences themselves, was, to the vulgar ear, the broad, plain, direct guarantee from the pains of purgatory, from hell itself, for tens, hundreds, thousands of years...
Page 81 - ... the presence of the crowd whom the ceremony had drawn to the sacred spot, to exalt the efficacy of indulgences. The people listened and wondered at the admirable virtues ascribed to them. A Jesuit historian says himself, in speaking of the Dominican friars whom Tetzel had associated with him: — " Some of these preachers did not fail, as usual, to distort their subject, and so to exaggerate the value of the indulgences as to lead the people to believe that, as soon as they gave their money,...
Page 135 - While the state has rights, she has them only in virtue and by permission of the superior authority; and that authority can only be expressed through the Church.

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