Seeing Faith, Printing Pictures: Religious Identity During the English Reformation

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BRILL, Feb 15, 2013 - Art - 243 pages
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Scholarship on religious printed images during the English Reformation (1535-1603) has generally focused on a few illustrated works and has portrayed this period in England as a predominantly non-visual religious culture. The combination of iconoclasm and Calvinist doctrine have led to a misunderstanding as to the unique ways that English Protestants used religious printed images. Building on recent work in the history of the book and print studies, this book analyzes the widespread body of religious illustration, such as images of God the Father and Christ, in Reformation England, assessing what religious beliefs they communicated and how their use evolved during the period. The result is a unique analysis of how the Reformation in England both destroyed certain aspects of traditional imagery as well as embraced and reformulated others into expressions of its own character and identity.
 

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Contents

Images and Early Modern Religious Identity
1
The Image in Early Modern Print
21
2 Printed Images and the Reformation in England
45
3 Christ the Virgin and the Catholic Tradition of Printed Images
71
Reforming the Imitatio Christi
103
Protestant Visions of the Father
143
Symbolic Pictures of God
179
Conclusion
213
Appendix
219
Select Bibliography
221
Index
241
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About the author (2013)

David J. Davis, Ph.D. (2009) in History, University of Exeter, is Assistant Professor in History at Houston Baptist University. He has published several articles and reviews on the English Reformation and early modern print culture.

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