Seeking Viable Grassroots Representation Mechanisms in African Constitutions: Integration of Indigenous and Modern Systems of Government in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Peter Lang, 2009 - Foreign Language Study - 723 pages
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In this book Charles Mwalimu explores viable grassroots representation mechanisms in African constitutions in order to positively integrate indigenous and modern systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. A comparative study method is used to examine the constitutional principles of chieftaincy and local government and their impact on human rights. To establish and prove lack of positive integration Mwalimu connects this failure to poor constitutionalism, development and stultified growth and human rights violations. This book proposes remedial actions to build nondiscriminatory constitutional regimes eradicating violations of human rights.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Lack of Uniformity in Norms and Inadequate
34
Definitions
59
Background
73
Conceptual Framework
79
The Chieftaincy as a Constitutional Principle
145
Gambia Ghana and Lesotho
185
Ghana
192
The Chieftaincy as a Constitutional Principle
361
Alternate Methods of Grassroots Representation
401
Corollaries and Solutions
423
Comparative Analysis of Viable Integration Models
457
Comparative Analysis of Viable Integration Models
491
Comparative Analysis of Viable Integration Models
527
Comparative Analysis of Viable Integration Models
559
Representation on Local Government
585

Lesotho
221
South Africa Zambia and Zimbabwe
235
Uganda
287
Swaziland
315
Lack of Uniformity in Norms and Inadequate
613
Selected Bibliography
637
Index 751
646
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

The Author: Charles Mwalimu is a former Senior Legal Specialist at the Law Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. He holds a Bachelor of Law degree from the University of Zambia, a Masters degree in law librarianship from the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, and a Masters degree in law from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., where he is currently a Ph.D. candidate. As an acknowledged and respected authority on all matters of African law, Mwalimu has advised governments, international organizations, and human rights organizations on democracy, development, and the rule of law in Africa. He has published extensively and is listed in Who's Who in American Law.

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