Select Essays of Dr. Johnson, Volume 2

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J.M. Dent, 1889
 

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Page 223 - No. 65., there is the following very extraordinary paragraph: " The authenticity of Clarendon's History, though printed with the sanction of one of the first universities of the world, had not an unexpected manuscript been happily discovered, would, with the help of factious credulity, have been brought into question, by the two lowest of all human beings, a scribbler for a party, and a commissioner of excise.
Page 112 - Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest welcome at an inn.
Page 130 - I do now publish my Essays, which of all my other works have been most current, for that, as it seems, they come home to men's business and bosoms.
Page 103 - The march begins, in military state, And nations on his eye suspended wait; Stern Famine guards the solitary coast, And Winter barricades the realms of Frost; He comes...
Page 193 - These are the great occasions which force the mind to take refuge in Religion: when we have no help in ourselves, what can remain but that we look up to a higher and a greater Power; and to what hope may we not raise our eyes and hearts, when we consider that the Greatest POWER is the BEST.
Page 40 - At supper this night he talked of good eating- with uncommon satisfaction. " Some people (said he,) have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very carefully ; for I look upon it, that he who does not mind his belly, will hardly mind any thing else.
Page 54 - The utmost excellence at which humility can arrive, is a constant and determinate pursuit of virtue, without regard to present dangers or advantage ; a continual reference of every action to the divine will ; an habitual appeal to everlasting justice ; and an unvaried elevation of the intellectual eye to the reward which perseverance only can obtain.
Page 86 - Enfin Malherbe vint, et, le premier en France, Fit sentir dans les vers une juste cadence. D'un mot mis en sa place enseigna le pouvoir. Et réduisit la muse aux règles du devoir.
Page 210 - After all this, it is surely superfluous to answer the question that has once been asked, Whether Pope was a poet? otherwise than by asking in return, If Pope be not a poet, where is poetry to be found?
Page 83 - I have never been much a favourite of the publick, nor can boast that, in the progress of my undertaking, I have been animated by the rewards of the liberal, the caresses of the great, or the praises of the eminent. But I have no design to gratify pride by submission, or malice by lamentation; nor think it reasonable to complain of neglect from those whose regard I never solicited. If I have not been distinguished by the distributors of literary honours, I have seldom descended to the arts by which...

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