Selected Poems

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Taylor & Francis, 2003 - Literary Collections - 90 pages
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Relational Psychotherapy: A Primeradvances the understanding of this comprehensive, reliable model of treatment as it follows the trajectory of the therapy process from beginning to end. Using clear language and warm human terms, experienced therapist and teacher Patricia DeYoung addresses the challenges and rewards of doing relational therapy. She presents relational therapy against a wide range of contemporary psychotherapies, weaving a working synthesis of self psychology, intersubjective theory, various psychoanalytically informed developmental theories, relational psychoanalysis, and feminist self-in-relation theory. Relational Psychotherapyis an essential reference text for both therapists and students, while its personal and lucid writing style make it easily accessible to clients interested in learning more about psychotherapy.
 

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Contents

Introduction
9
The Argument of his Book
23
The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad
37
To his Mistress Objecting to him neither Toying nor Talking
46
The NightPiece to Julia
59
To the Virgins to Make Much of Time
72
The Sadness of Things for Sapphos Sickness
75
His Poetry his Pillar
88
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About the author (2003)

Robert Herrick: August 24, 1591 - October 15, 1674 Robert Herrick is one of the Cavalier poets and the most gifted of the "tribe of Ben", the small band of poets influenced by Ben Jonson. Herrick is considered one of the greatest English songwriters. He published only one volume of verse, an astonishing collection of 1,200 poems known as the Hesperides and Noble Numbers (1648). Although Herrick was an Anglican priest, many of his poems deal with sensual pleasures, stressing the need for carpe diem - to seize the day - since youth and joy pass so quickly. Herrick's verse is intensely musical and reflects classical and Anglican ceremony, English folklore, and timeless myth. He is best known for his short poem, "To Virgins, To Make Much of Time," which begins, "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may," encouraging young people to enjoy themselves while they still can.

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