Selecting an Ada Compilation System

Front Cover
J. Dawes, M. J. Pickett, A. Wearing
Cambridge University Press, 1990 - Computers - 173 pages
In 1983 there were just three compilers that implemented the full Ada language. By 1989, there were 171 base compilers and 70 derived compilers supplied by about fifty independent vendors. The proliferation of compilation systems spawned the need for a book such as this, which aims to guide Ada users in effectively formulating their requirements for a software project, evaluating those requirements, and selecting an Ada compilation system based on the evaluation. For the purposes of this guidebook the compilation system is taken to be those tools that are an integral part of the Ada system: the editor, compiler, various listing tools, linker, target loader, and debugger. It begins in Part I with a number of chapters discussing applications, such as size or interfacing. Part II consists of questions and answers specifically chosen to yield significant information about choosing a compilation system. The last part contains a number of chapters on various sources of information. The conclusions found in this book should prove essential reading for anyone considering adoption of the Ada programming language and will be of value to the entire Ada community.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Application Requirements
5
Introduction to Part I
7
Long Lifetime
9
Large Program Size
11
Portability
13
CompileTime Operational Qualities
15
Software Interfacing
21
Training
61
Questionnaires
63
Introduction to Part II
67
Compilation System Facilities
69
Quality and Documentation
79
Performance and Capacity
91
RunTime Implementation Concerns
99
Architectural Considerations
103

RunTime Operational Qualities
25
Concurrency
31
Security
35
Timing Constraints
37
HostTarget Development
41
Embedded Application Systems
43
Hardware Interfacing
47
Exploitation of Target and Computational Capacity
49
Multiprocessing
51
Use of High Level Tools
59
ManMachine Interface
127
LanguageRelated Characteristics
131
ToolBuilding Activities
139
Contractual Matters
143
Sources of Information
151
Introduction to Part III
153
Benchmarks
155
Evaluation Systems
159
Published Literature
161
Copyright

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