Selections from Locke's Essay on the Human Understanding

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General Books LLC, 2009 - Literary Collections - 158 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...instrument of knowledge, more thoroughly weighed, a great many of the controversies that make such a noise in the world would of themselves cease; and the way to knowledge, and perhaps peace too, lie a great deal opener than it does. 22. This should teach us moderation in imposing our own sense of old authors.--Sure I am, that the signification of words, in all languages, depending very much on the thoughts, notions, and ideas of him that uses them, must unavoidably be of great uncertainty to men of the same language and country. This is so evident in the Greek authors, that he that shall peruse their writings will find, in almost every one of them, a distinct language, though the same words. But when to this natural difficulty in every country there shall be added different countries and remote ages, wherein the sp_e kers and writers had very different notions, tempers, customs, ornaments and figures of speech, &c., every one of which influenced the signification of their words then, though to us now they are lost and unknown, it would become us to be charitable one to another in our interpretations or misunderstanding of those ancient writings; which, though of great concernment to be understood, are liable to the unavoidable difficulties of speech, which (if we except the names of simple ideas, and some very obvious things) is not capable, without a constant defining the terms, of conveying the sense and intention of the speaker without any manner of doubt and uncertainty to the hearer. And in discourses of religion, law, and morality, as they are matters of the highest concernment, so there will be the greatest difficulty. 23. The volumes of interpreters and commentators on the Old and New Testament are but too manifest proofs of this....

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About the author (2009)

John L. Locke holds a Chair in Human Communication Sciences John L. Locke holds a Chair in Human Communication Sciences at the University of Sheffield and is Senior Research Fellowat the University of Sheffield and is Senior Research Fellow in the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at the Univ in the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cambridge, England. Born in the United States, he ersity of Cambridge, England. Born in the United States, he was formerly Director of the Neurolinguistics Laboratory at was formerly Director of the Neurolinguistics Laboratory at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Lecturer on Neurologythe Massachusetts General Hospital and Lecturer on Neurology at Harvard Medical School. He is married and lives in Cambr at Harvard Medical School. He is married and lives in Cambridge, England. idge, England.

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