Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Nov 20, 2009 - Social Science - 320 pages
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In this previously untold story of African American self-education, Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery, during the Civil War, and in the first decades of freedom. Self-Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African Americans emerged into plans and action once slavery ended.

Enslaved people, Williams contends, placed great value in the practical power of literacy, whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War. Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acquire literacy, and when slavery ended, they became the first teachers of other freedpeople. Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education, they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid. Williams argues that by teaching, building schools, supporting teachers, resisting violence, and claiming education as a civil right, African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners.



 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Acquiring Literacy in Slave Communities
7
Literacy in the First Days of Freedom
30
African American Soldiers and the Educational Mission
45
Advocacy for Education
67
Organizing Schools on the Ground
80
African American Teachers in Freedpeoples Schools
96
Textbooks and Freedpeoples Schools
126
Students in Freedpeoples Schools
138
The Creation of Common School Systems for Black and White Students
174
Epilogue
201
African Americans Literacy and the Law in the Antebellum South
203
Notes
215
Bibliography
265
Index
287
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About the author (2009)

Heather Andrea Williams, a former attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice and the New York State Attorney General's Office, is assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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