Selling Free Enterprise: The Business Assault on Labor and Liberalism, 1945-60

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University of Illinois Press, 1994 - Business & Economics - 307 pages
The post-World War II years in the United States were marked by the business community's efforts to discredit New Deal liberalism and undermine the power and legitimacy of organized labor. In Selling Free Enterprise, Elizabeth Fones-Wolf describes how conservative business leaders strove to reorient workers away from their loyalties to organized labor and government, teaching that prosperity could be achieved through reliance on individual initiative, increased productivity, and the protection of personal liberty.
Based on research in a wide variety of business and labor sources, this detailed account shows how business permeated every aspect of American life, including factories, schools, churches, and community institutions.
 

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This is one of the most important books of our times. This grates against the accepted views on labor, private industry and the roles workers, consumers and business play in society. The author completed extensive research on the subject for the book and cites every single source with impeccability. This attention to detail is necessary to combat the disinformation of Sean Hannity, Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin and the other misanthropes who seek to undermine history, knowledge and the well being of the American populace.
Read this book, donate copies to your local library and school. Make this required reading for all high schoolstudents.
 

Contents

Nothing Less than Catastrophic Civil War
15
Defending the Free Enterprise System The National Political Arena
32
In the Factory
65
Building Company Consciousness
67
The Lighted Union Hall Building Union Consciousness
108
In the Community
135
Meet Your CIO Neighbors
137
A Beachhead in the Community
158
Educating for Capitalism Business and the Schools
189
Walking Hand in Hand Business Labor and Religion
218
After the Merger
255
A Matter of Individual Rights
257
Conclusion
285
Primary Sources Consulted
291
Index
297
Copyright

Institutions
187

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Page 5 - Failing that, a number of trade journals, the publications of the National Association of Manufacturers and the United States Chamber of Commerce recommended that the act be ignored until it was tested in the courts.

About the author (1994)

Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf is an assistant professor of history at West Virginia University and was an associate editor of The Samuel Gompers Papers.

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