Selling Women: Prostitution, Markets, and the Household in Early Modern Japan

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University of California Press, Jun 19, 2012 - History - 256 pages
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“At last, a study that goes far beyond the urban-centered discourse with which we are already familiar to place the trafficking of women in a solid historical and comparative context. Through a carefully reasoned and balanced analysis of diverse sources, Stanley shows how prostitution practices varied. This book will set the standard for studies of prostitution in early modern Japan for decades to come.” -Anne Walthall, University of California, Irvine

Selling Women is a remarkable achievement. With her gaze fixed firmly on the young women whose labor sustained prostitution as an industry, Amy Stanley traces shifts in the moral economy of the sex trade over the course of the Tokugawa era, and unveils the ironic consequences of economic growth and social change. This meticulously researched, wonderfully written book is a major contribution to the literature on gender and society in Japan.” -David L. Howell, Harvard University

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
part one regulation and the logic of the household
21
Benevolence
45
Prostitutes
72
part two expansion and the logic
101
Child Sellers
111
Glittering Hair Ornaments and Barren
134
Tora and the Rules of the Pleasure
163
Conclusion
189
Notes
199
Bibliography
225
Index
243
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About the author (2012)

Amy Stanley is Assistant Professor of History at Northwestern University.

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