Selling credit and traffic: Selling and buying, by Ralph Starr Butler .... Credit and the credit man, by Lee Galloway .... Traffic, by Phillip B. Kennedy ..., Parts 1-3

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Contents

Specialty Salesman
10
CHAPTER II
13
Advantages of Selling Through a Retail Store
14
Disadvantages of Selling Through a Retail Store
15
Advantage in Purchasing Power
16
Size Is Most Important
17
Retail Selling by Mail
18
Advantages of Retail Selling by the Mailorder Method
19
Disadvantages of Retail Selling by the Mailorder Method
22
Combinations of Retail Selling Methods
23
CHAPTER III
25
Two Methods of Wholesale Selling
26
Wholesale Selling by Salesmen
27
Wholesale Selling by Mail
29
Combination of Wholesale Selling Methods
30
CHAPTER IV
31
Factors in Solution of First Problem
32
Nature of the Product
33
Advantages of Making Direct Sales Only to Jobbers
35
Disadvantages of Making Direct Sales Only to Jobbers
36
Advantages of Making Direct Sales Only to Retailers
37
Disadvantages of Making Direct Sales Only to Retailers
38
Second Selling Problem of Manufacturer
39
Declining Importance of Middleman
40
Jobbers Place in Merchandising System
41
Agents Commission Merchants and Brokers
43
CHAPTER V
46
Retail Sales Department Organization
47
Merchandise Manager i
48
Buyers
52
Salespeople
53
Variations in Departmental Organization
55
Advertising Department
57
motion pass 49 Lack of Uniformity in Wholesale Selling Organizations
58
Manager of Departments
60
Department Managers
61
General Salesmen
62
Jobbers Advertising Department
64
Special Application of the Suggestive Wholesale Selling Organization
65
CHAPTER VI
67
Sales Manager
70
Superintendents of Different Kinds of Selling Activities
71
Salesmen
72
Manufacturers Retail Stores
73
Credit and Traffic Departments
75
Method of Adapting the Manufacturers Selling De partment Organization Chart
76
CHAPTER VII
78
Use of Tact in Securing Cooperation
79
Profitsharing to Induce Cooperation
81
Committee System as an Aid to Cooperation
82
Executive Committee
84
Factory Committee
87
SECTION PAOE 74 Sales Committee
88
Advertising Committee
89
77 Variations in System
90
CHAPTER VIII
92
Two Chief Factors in Selling Campaign
93
Qualifications of a Sales Manager
94
Selection of Salesmen
95
System as an Aid in Selection
96
Personal Interview
99
Conversational Ability
100
CHAPTER IX
102
Training in Principles of Salesmenship
103
Training in Construction and Uses of Goods to be Sold
105
Three Methods of Training Salesmen
106
Employment in the Factory Best Method
107
Training in Selling Methods
108
Standard Selling Talks
109
Adaptation of Standard Selling Talks Ill 96 Meeting Problems Peculiar to a Business
111
CHAPTER X
114
Personal Interviews
115
Keeping in Touch with Salesmen by Letter
116
Competitive Schemes to Promote Selling Efficiency
119
Selling Conferences
120
Other Duties of Sales Manager
121
Salesmens Expenses r
123
Assignment of Sales Territories
124
Keeping in Touch with Salesmen
125
Knowledge of the Business as Factor in Promoting Sales Department Efficiency
126
CHAPTER XI
128
A Typical Salesmans Report
129
Salesmen Must Observe Closely
130
A Typical Statistical System
131
Salesmans Part in Promoting Sales Department Effi ciency 183
133
Definition of Salesmanship
136
Steps in a Sale
138
Arousing Interest
141
Creating Desire
143
Inducing Resolution and Inciting to Action
144
Importance of Steps in a Sale
146
SECTION E 125 Factors in a Sale
148
Inclination for Work
149
Mental Ability
150
General Education
151
Health
152
Importance of Appearance
153
Honesty
154
Sincerity
155
Fidelity
156
Industry
157
Openmindedness
158
Persistence
159
Initiative
160
Knowledge of the Business
161
Confidence
164
Enthusiasm
165
Opportunities in Salesmenship
166
CHAPTER XIV
168
Scope of Buyers Duties 16
170
Financial Considerations
172
Illustrations
173
Speculative Buying
174
Knowledge of Manufacturing Processes
175
SECTION PAOI 157 Familiarity with Departmental Divisions of House
176
Knowledge of Demand
177
1G0 Buyer for Wholesale or Retail Store
178
Knowledge of Goods to be Purchased
179
Judging Future Prices
181
Knowledge of Sources of Supply
182
Importance of Location of Various Houses
183
Credit Rating of Seller
184
1C8 Selling Methods of Houses Dealt With
185
Variable Price Scales
186
Friendly Relations with Salesmen
187
Other Qualities Important for Buyer to Possess
188
Factory Purchasing Agents
189
CHAPTER XV
191
Requirements of an Adequate Purchasing System
192
Firm Index
193
Necessity of Crossreferences for Buying Data
195
Catalogue File
196
Quotation File
197
Order Record
198
Placing Orders
200
Tracing Orders
201
Checking Deliveries
202
18i Checking Partial Deliveries
203
Checking the Invoice
204
The Perpetual Inventory
206
Modification of the Typical Purchasing System
208
The Jobbers Purchasing System
210
CREDIT AND THE CREDIT MAN CHAPTER I
212
Contracts Support Confidence
213
Money a Sign of Economic Progress
214
Bargains Which Involved Future Delivery
215
The Relation of Money to Credit
216
Effect of Too Ready Credit upon the Consumer
233
Other Abuses of Credit
234
Mercantile Credit
235
Factors That Have Changed the Credit System
237
The Custom of Dating
238
The Book Account
239
Two Methods of Assigning Accounts
241
CHAPTER III
243
Elements of Safety in Capital Credit
244
SBCTION PAGE 25 Principal Forms of Capital Credit
245
Principal Sources of Capital Funds 24G 27 Banking Credit and Its Relation to Commercial Credit 245
246
Limitation of Bank Credit
247
The Credit Latitude of a Bank and a Mercantile House
248
Business Paper and Loans and Discounts
249
CHAPTER IV
252
Credit Extension in the Wholesale Trade
253
Granting Credit by a Manufacturing Firm
254
The Giving of Credit by a Retail House
255
Installment House Credits
256
CHAPTER V
258
Testing the Reliability of a Statement
259
An Example of Statement Analysis
269
The Reporter and the Traveling Representative
270
The Salesman as a Gatherer of Information
272
Agency Method
273
The Commercial Agency
275
Content of the Agency Reports
277
Methods by Which the Information Is Distributed
278
Cost of the Agency Service
279
Kinds of Reports
280
Criticism of Agency Methods and Services
281
Credit Cooperative MethodsSpecial Agencies
284
Advantages of Interchange System
291
Banks as Sources of Information
292
Attorneyatlaw
293
CREDIT PROTECTION maim warn 55 Efforts to Secure Protection
296
Credit Insurance
297
Business Houses Classified by Credit Underwriters
298
Arguments in Favor of Credit Insurance
299
Weak Points in Credit Insurance
300
GO National Bankruptcy Laws 801
301
Advantages of the Present Law
303
Meaning of Recent Amendments
304
Future of the Bankruptcy Law
306
Credit Mens Associations
307
National Association
308
Importance of Credit Mens Associations
311
07 Relation of the Credit Man to the Firm
312
An Illustrative MethodThe Mail Index Cards etc
313
Collection Methods
317
Suspended Accounts
318
Analysis of Credit Information
319
TRAFFIC CHAPTER I
325
Papers Required in Freight Shipments
327
Delivery of Freight
329
Delay in Getting Cars
331
Time Required in Transit
333
Demurrage Charges
338
Handling Shippers Claims against Railroads
340
CHAPTER II
346
The Relative Importance of Freight Traffic
347
BBCT1TW PAQB 10 General Principles of Rate Classification
348
Freight Classification
349
Difficulties That Arise in Differences in Classifications
350
Principles of Classification as Illustrated by Decisions
353
New Policy in Reference to Classification
354
The Parcel Post
356
Parcel Post and Express Rates
357
Parcel Post and Mail Order Business
359
Parcel Post and the Farmer
360
CHAPTER III
362
Guarding against Railroad Favors to Individuals
363
More Traffic as an Argument for a Lower Rate
364
The Effect of Water Competition
366
Competition of Producing Points in Common Markets
368
Export Rates
369
Competition of Facilities
370
Long and Short Haul Principle 871
371
Flexibility of Freight Rates 872
372
CHAPTER IV
374
The Various Routes of Traffic
376
How Trunk Line Rates Are Determined
377
Rates to Interior Trunk Line Points
378
Another
379
SECTION PAOB 38 Rates to New England Points
381
State Rates in Trunk Line Territory
382
CHAPTER V
385
What a Basing Point Is 887
386
An Early Basing Point Decision
388
Atlanta as a Center
389
Texas Cotton Takes the Water Route
392
Competition between East and Far West
395
Texas Rates
396
CHAPTER VI
399
Official and Western Classifications Compared
401
Some Cities do Not Enjoy Equalized Rates
402
Rates to Kansas Nebraska and the Dakotas
403
Common Point System in the Mountain States
404
Rates to Arizona Nevada and New Mexico
405
The Transcontinental Blanket
406
GO Effect of Blanket Rates
408
The Case of Wool Shipments
409
BECTtON PAGB 68 Lumber Rates
419
CHAPTER VII
422
Expected Gains from the Erie Barge Canal
423
New Yorks Decreasing Grain Exports
424
Possibilities of the Barge Canal
425
Plans for State Control of the Barge Canal
426
ChicagototheGulf Deep Waterway
428
The Mississippi Has Declined as a Traffic Route
430
Coastwise Shipping Plays an Important Role
431
The Purpose of Railway Control of Coastwise Shipping
433
Only Independent Lines May Use the Panama Canal
435
The Effect of the Panama Canal on Domestic Traffic Routes
436
Percentage of Westbound Traffic Which Goes Through to Pacific Terminals
438
Effect of Panama Canal in Changing Traffic Routes
439
The Probable Effect of the Panama Canal on Railroad
440
Rates
442
Traffic Situation at Interior Points
447
MOTION PAGE 05 Where Our Exports Go
448
Balance
449
Americas Growing Manufacturers
452
Character of U S Exports to Germany
453
Exports to Great Britain
454
United States Gaining in Trade with South America and the East
455
Shipping Terms and Methods
457
How New York Handles Export Traffic
458
Character of Ocean Freight Rates
460
Frequent Changes in Ocean Rates
461
The Status of Competition on the Ocean
462
The Shipping Trust Investigation
464
Harbor Development
467
The Legal Position of Commissions
468
Powers of Interstate Commerce Commission over Per sonal Discrimination
471
Additional Powers Conferred by Hepburn Act
472
Personal Discriminations in Routing
474
117 Powers of Interstate Commerce Commission over Service
475
The Wisconsin Railroad Commission
478
The New York Public Utilities Commission
479
Examples of State Laws against Closing Transportation
482
Service
484
Examples of State Law in Reference to Rates
485
SECTION PAGB
487
Fair Returns to the Railroad
493
Proposed Zones for Western Rates 413
545
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Page 469 - That if any common carrier subject to the provisions of this act shall, directly or indirectly, by any special rate, rebate, drawback, or other device, charge, demand, collect or receive from any person or persons a greater or less compensation...
Page 250 - B at six months' credit, and takes a bill at six months for it ; and that B, within a month after, sells the same goods, at a like credit to C, taking a like bill ; and again, that C, after another month, sells them to D, taking a like bill, and so on.
Page 263 - A merchant who desires to serve his own best interests should recognize that his most valuable possession, apart from his actual assets, is a sound, substantial and unquestioned reputation as a credit risk, and that, under the prevailing conditions and demands of business, the most effective, and eminently the best way to prove his basis for credit, is to be willing to submit a statement of his financial condition.
Page 250 - Real notes," it is sometimes said, " represent actual property. There are actual goods in existence, whicli are the counterpart to every real note. Notes which are not drawn in consequence of a sale of goods, are a species of false wealth, by which a nation is deceived These supply only an imaginary capital; the others indicate oue that • is reaL...
Page 263 - Good credit in the markets of the world enables every merchant to add to his ability to do business. It gives him the use of enlarged capital, thus enabling him to carry a more complete stock, increase his sales, and magnify his profits. Large assets are not always necessary to the creation of credit; what is most desirable is, that credit be in relative proportion to the actual assets, and in harmony with conditions which create and maintain it A merchant's capital is the sum of his net available...
Page 263 - The giver of credit is a contributor of capital, and becomes, in a certain sense, a partner of the debtor, and, as such, has a perfect right to complete information of the debtor's condition at all times.
Page 441 - Francisco by water at rates materially lower than those maintained by the defendants by rail. We have used San Francisco as the destination port upon the Pacific coast, and in some instances rates from New York to San Francisco are a trifle lower than to...
Page 482 - Every corporation, person or common carrier performing a service designated in the preceding section, shall furnish, with respect thereto, such service and facilities as shall be safe and adequate and in all respects just and reasonable.
Page 260 - Bankers, the undersigned agree that in case of failure or insolvency on the part of the undersigned, or in the event of it appearing at any time that any of the following representations are untrue, or in case of the occurrence of such change as aforesaid or of failure to notify...
Page 251 - In order to justify the supposition that a real bill (as it is called) represents actual property, there ought to be some power in the bill-holder to prevent the property which the bill represents from being turned to other purposes than that of paying the bill in question. No such power exists : neither the man who holds the real bill, nor the man who discounts it, has any property in the specific goods for which it was given...

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