Senior Executive Reward: Key Models and Practices

Front Cover
Gower Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - Business & Economics - 86 pages
Executive pay remains a contentious topic for many organizations. Unfortunately for company executives, much of the writing about it is either sensationalist or highly academic; none of it much help to the reader looking for a balanced and informed view of the subject. Sandy Pepper provides company executives, investors, and advisers with a summary of the main theories (from economics, game theory and the behavioural sciences) and best practices (in corporate governance, tax, accounting, compliance and so on) that relate to the compensation of senior executives. He also reviews the current state of corporate governance as it affects executive reward in Europe and the US. And he backs the text up with case study examples. Senior Executive Reward is an intelligent, practical and balanced explanation of the basis on which modern executives are compensated - and why. It is must-have reading for anyone who is interested in the complex and often controversial topic of executive pay, particularly remuneration committee members, professional advisers and senior executives anxious to understand for themselves (and explain to others) the basis on which they are rewarded.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

COMPENSATION BENEFITS
7
ECONOMIC MODELS
15
PSYCHOLOGY SOCIOLOGY
29
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
43
TAX AND ACCOUNTING
51
TURNING THEORY INTO PRACTICE
61
APPENDICES 7180
71
Swiss Corporate Governance Rules for Executive Pay
77
Index
85
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Sandy Pepper is an ex-partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers in London (he wasleader of their global Human Resource Services practice). A Chartered Accountant, Sandy specialises in senior executive reward, employee share schemes, and the taxation of international executives. A frequent contributor to industry events and technical journals, Sandy has written about leadership in the International Journal of Change Management and executive remuneration in Euromoney's International Corporate Governance Review. He joined Department of Management London School of Economics in 2008. He is a Fellow of The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce.

Bibliographic information