September 11 in Popular Culture: A Guide

Front Cover
ABC-CLIO, 2010 - Social Science - 319 pages

On Thanksgiving day after September 11, 2001, comic strip creators directed readers to donate money in their artwork, generating $50,000 in relief funds. The world's largest radio network, Clear Channel, sent a memo to all of its affiliated stations recommending 150 songs that should be eliminated from airplay because of assumptions that their lyrics would be perceived as offensive in light of the events of 9/11. On the first anniversary of September 11th, choirs around the world performed Mozart's Requiem at 8:46 am in each time zone, the time of the first attack on the World Trade Center.

These examples are just three of the ways the world--but especially the United States--responded to the events of September 11, 2001. Each chapter in this book contains a chronological overview of the sea of changes in everyday life, literature, entertainment, news and media, and visual culture after September 11. Shorter essays focus on specific books, TV shows, songs, and films.

 

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Contents

Everyday Life
1
News and Information
51
Books
89
Television
131
Photo Essay
172
Film
173
Music
213
Visual Culture
247
Selected 911 Books TV Shows Films Music and Visual Arts
293
Further Reading
299
Index
301
About the Editors and Contributors
311
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Sara E. Quay, PhD, is dean of the school of education and director of the Endicott Scholars Honors Program at Endicott College, Beverly, MA.

Amy M. Damico, PhD, is associate professor in the School of Communication at Endicott College, Beverly, MA, and is the faculty advisor to the Endicott Scholars honors program.

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