Serving Two Masters: Conflicts of Interest in the Modern Law Firm

Front Cover
Hart Publishing, 2002 - Law - 212 pages
1 Review
It is a sine qua non of legal practice that lawyers should not allow themselves to act for two clients whose interests may,potentially, conflict. However, this principle is being placed under increasing pressure, the main reasons for this being increased demand for specialist legal services, the globalisation of commerce, a dramatic growth in the size of leading law firms, and significantly greater mobility within the legal profession.As a result, there is a growing trend, especially within the commercial legal environment, for solicitors to face conflicts of interest which have no easy solution. Increasingly, conflicts are being 'managed', rather than avoided altogether. This is a field within which the Law Society's own rules are flouted on a daily basis, and in which these rules appear increasingly at odds with the common law.Based on extensive interviews with lawyers and their clients, this book provides the first thorough consideration of how conflicts of interest are handled within law firms. It will be essential reading to all those who have an interest in professional legal ethics, including law students, legal scholars, practitioners, and regulators.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1841132292_02
17
1841132292_03
51
1841132292_04
75
1841132292_05
95
1841132292_06
109
1841132292_07
143
1841132292_08
163
1841132292_09
191
1841132292_10
201
1841132292_11
209
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - A lawyer may not advise, represent or act on behalf of two or more clients in the same matter if there is a conflict, or a significant risk of a conflict, between the interests of those clients".

About the author (2002)

Janine Griffiths-Baker is a Lecturer in the Law Department,University of Bristol.

Bibliographic information