Several tracts

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Printed by J.P. for W. Shrowsbery at the Bible in Duke-Lane, 1684 - Christianity - 129 pages
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Page 101 - God to fill your hearts with his grace, fear, and love, and to let you see the...
Page 67 - Taylor, Common Good (1652), 51. In 1683 Sir M. Hale wrote, "Whereas in that State that things are, oar Popaloasuess, which is the greatest blessing a Kingdom can have, becomes the burden of the Kingdom, by breeding up whole Races and Families, and successive Generations, in a mere Trade of Idleness, Thieving, Begging and a barbarous kind of life which mast in time prodigiously increase and overgrow the whole face of the kingdom and eat out the heart of it.
Page 18 - God and peace of conscience above all the wealth and honours in the world, and be very vigilant to keep it inviolably ; though he be under a due apprehension of the love of God to him, yet it keeps him humble and watchful and free from all...
Page 70 - ... of God, the very proceeds that will be able and fit to work, of poor families, will be more than double to what they are now, which will continually increafe in a kind of geometrical progreflion, whereby there will be enough for double the employment that is now for them.
Page 17 - It makes a man entirely depend on him, seek him for guidance, direction, and protection, and submit to his will with patience and resignation of soul. It gives the law, not only to his words and actions, but to his very thoughts and purposes ; so that he dares not entertain any which are unbecoming the presence of that God by whom all our thoughts are legible.
Page 68 - By this means the wealth of the nation will be increafecf, manufactures advanced, and every body put into a capacity of eating his own bread ; for upon what imaginable account can we think, that we...
Page 22 - Solomon comprehended it in a few words, ' Fear God and keep his Commandments, * for this is the whole duty of man.' The foul and life of religion is the fear of God, which is the Principle of Obedience ; but Obedience to his Commands, which is an a& or exercife of that life, is various, according to the variety of the Commands of God.
Page 63 - there are rates made for the relief of the impotent poor ; and, it may be, the same relief is also given in a narrow measure unto some others that have great families, and upon this they live miserably and at best from hand to mouth ; and if they cannot get work to make out their livelihood, they and their children set up a trade of begging at best...
Page 63 - ... to raise any considerable stock for the poor, nor indeed so much as to the ordinary contributions ; but they lay all the rates to the poor upon the rents of lands and houses, which alone, without the help of the stocks, are not able to raise a stock for the poor...
Page 17 - God ; it makes a man truly to love, to honour, to obey him, and therefore careful to know what his will is ; it renders the heart highly thankful to him, both as his Creator, Redeemer and Benefactor; it makes a man entirely to depend upon...

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