Sex and Character: An Investigation of Fundamental Principles

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Indiana University Press, Apr 14, 2005 - Philosophy - 496 pages
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Otto Weininger's controversial book Sex and Character, first published in Vienna in 1903, is a prime example of the conflicting discourses central to its time: antisemitism, scientific racism and biologism, misogyny, the cult and crisis of masculinity, psychological introspection versus empiricism, German idealism, the women's movement and the idea of human emancipation, the quest for sexual liberation, and the debates about homosexuality. Combining rational reasoning with irrational outbursts, in the context of today's scholarship, Sex and Character speaks to issues of gender, race, cultural identity, the roots of Nazism, and the intellectual history of modernism and modern European culture. This new translation presents, for the first time, the entire text, including Weininger's extensive appendix with amplifications of the text and bibliographical references, in a reliable English translation, together with a substantial introduction that places the book in its cultural and historical context.

 

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Contents

Men and Women
12
Arrhenoplasm and Thelyplasm
16
Laws of Sexual Attraction
27
Homosexuality and Pederasty
41
Characterology and Morphology
47
Emancipated Women
57
Man and Woman
69
Male and Female Sexuality
75
Logic Ethics and the Self
133
The Problem of the Self and Genius
143
Male and Female Psychology
161
Motherhood and Prostitution
188
Eroticism and Aesthetics
211
The Nature of Woman and Her Purpose in the Universe
230
Judaism
272
Woman and Humanity
301

Male and Female Consciousness
82
Endowment and Genius
91
Endowment and Memory
101
Memory Logic Ethics
124
Additions and References
315
Index
427
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Page xl - The castration complex is the deepest unconscious root of anti-semitism; for even in the nursery little boys hear that a Jew has something cut off his penis — a piece of his penis, they think — and this gives them a right to despise Jews. And there is no stronger unconscious root for the sense of superiority over women.

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About the author (2005)

Ladislaus Löb is Emeritus Professor of German at the University of Sussex.

Daniel Steuer is Senior Lecturer in German in the School of Humanities, University of Sussex.

Laura Marcus is Reader in English in the School of Humanities, University of Sussex.

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