Sexus: The Rosy Crucifixion I

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Grove/Atlantic, Inc., Dec 1, 2007 - Fiction - 506 pages
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Henry Miller's monumental venture in self-revelation was begun with his Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, which on their American publication were hailed as "miraculous," "superb," "ribald," "brilliant," and "shamelessly shocking." Sexus is the first volume of a series called The Rosy Crucifixion, in which Miller completes his major life work. It was written in the United States during World War II, and first published in Paris in 1949. Of this remarkable project, Lawrence Durrell has said: "The completion of his seven-volume autobiography, if it fulfills the promise of what he has already given us, will put his name amongst the three or four great figures of the age."
 

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I LOVED this book, as well as the entire Rosy Cruxifiction Trilogy.

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Contents

Chapter 1
5
Chapter 2
26
Chapter 3
64
Chapter 4
85
Chapter 5
102
Chapter 6
116
Chapter 7
140
Chapter 8
154
Chapter 13
291
Chapter 14
311
Chapter 15
342
Chapter 16
365
Chapter 17
389
Chapter 18
404
Chapter 19
427
Chapter 20
431

Chapter 9
185
Chapter 10
216
Chapter 11
253
Chapter 12
270
Chapter 21
434
Chapter 22
468
Chapter 23
489
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Page 17 - ... float to the surface of its own impulse. A child has no need to write, he is innocent. A man writes to throw off the poison which he has accumulated because of his false way of life. He is trying to recapture his innocence, yet all he succeeds in doing (by writing) is to inoculate the world with the virus of his disillusionment. No man would set a word down on paper if he had the courage to live out what he believed in. His inspiration is deflected at the source. If it is a world of truth, beauty...
Page 20 - The art of dreaming when wide awake will be in the power of every man one day. Long before that books will cease to exist, for when men are wide awake and dreaming their powers of communication (with one another and with the spirit that moves all men) will be so enhanced as to make writing seem like the harsh and raucous squawks of an idiot.

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About the author (2007)

Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 - June 7, 1980) American novelist, was born in New York City. His most famous works, Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, were written while Miller was an expatriate living in Paris and were originally published in France in the mid-1930s. At that time, the two books were widely considered obscene in the United States, and they were banned from sale there until 1961. Some of Miller's other works include The Colossus of Maroussi and Big Sur and the Oranges of Heironymus Bosch. Henry Miller was married five times and he also had an extended love affair with Anais Nin. He died in 1980 in his home in Pacific Palisades, California.

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