Shades of Sexuality: Colors and Sexual Identity in the Novels of Blaise Cendrars

Front Cover
Rodopi, 1997 - Social Science - 162 pages
Shades of Sexuality: Colors and Sexual Identity in the Novels of Blaise Cendrars, by Amanda Leamon, is currently one of the few studies on the modernist poet and novelist Blaise Cendrars to be written in English. Of interest to scholars of Cendrars, Modernism, Twentieth Century French Literature and early Twentieth Century Art and Humanities, Shades of Sexuality is unique among the growing body of criticism and analysis of Cendrars' fiction in that it explores the ways in which Cendrars makes use of the spectrum of fragmented colors and other elements of disguise and trompe-l'oeil, both as an artistic device in the construction of the fictional tekst, and as a recurrent motif in the representation and exploration of the male subject and his relation to woman. The author demonstrates how Cendrars effects intersections of gender in the tekst through the manipulation of colors and their associations with femininity, ultimately undermining the illusory façade of male autonomy which dominates his fictional corpus.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Le monde est ma representation
9
Colors and Sexual Identity
37
The Colors of Blaise Cendrars
111
Le leopard meurt avec ses couleurs
148
Works Cited
155
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - Woman is not just an other in the sense of something beyond his ken, but an other intimately related to him as the image of what he is not, and therefore as an essential reminder of what he is.
Page 7 - ... in the sense of something beyond his ken, but an other intimately related to him as the image of what he is not, and therefore as an essential reminder of what he is. Man therefore needs this other even as he spurns it, is constrained to give a positive identity to what he regards as no-thing. Not only is his own being parasitically dependent upon the woman, and upon the act of excluding and subordinating her, but one reason why such exclusion is necessary is because she may not be quite so other...

Bibliographic information