Shadow Catcher: The Life and Work of Edward S. Curtis

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U of Nebraska Press, Sep 29, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 132 pages
2 Reviews
When the twentieth century was just getting under way, Edward S. Curtis began documenting North Amencan Indian culture in words and photographs. Today, almost one hundred years later, his work still stands as the most extensive and informative collection of its kind. His photographs are more than mere documents, they are works of art revealing subtleties of human expression missing from other history and anthropology records. For thirty years, Curtis devoted himself to compiling The North American Indian, twenty volumes of text and oversized photogravure plates. This was a largely unprofitable project, and Curtis sacrificed his family life and his health to make lengthy visits to American Indian communities throughout the western United States and Canada. Filled with Curtis's breathtaking photographs, Shadow Catcher traces Curtis's life and work from his boyhood in Wisconsin, through his first photo expedition to Alaska in 1897 and the completion of The North American Indian collection in 1930, to his death in 1952.

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User Review  - Abbess - LibraryThing

Quick read, with fast-moving biography of the great photographer's life, and some of his beautiful and often illuminating photographs, but this is barely a sip at his work. A nice book for beginning ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - juglicerr - LibraryThing

This is a good, well illustrated book that is intended for young adults, but is also good for adults who want more than a Wikipedia or encyclopedia article, but less that a full biography. It is also ... Read full review


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Section 8
Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12

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About the author (2005)

Laurie Lawlor has published more than thirty-four books for children, young adults, and adults, including Helen Keller: Rebellious Spirit, an American Library Association Notable Children?s Book, and a memoir based on natural history, This Tender Place: Story of a Wetland Year.

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