Shakespeare and the Cleopatra/Caesar Intertext: Sequel, Conflation, Remake

Front Cover
Fairleigh Dickinson, Jul 16, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 226 pages
0 Reviews
Is William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra a sequel to the earlier Julius Caesar? If this question raises issues of authorship and reception, it also interrogates the construction of dramatic sequels: how does a playtext ultimately become the follow-up of another text? This book explores how dramatic works written before and after Shakespeare's time have encouraged us to view Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra as strongly interconnected plays, encouraging their sequelization in the theater and paving the way toward the filmic conflations of the twentieth century. Uniquely blending theories of literary and filmic intertextuality with issues of race and gender, and written by an experienced author trained both in early modern and film studies, this book can easily find its place in any syllabus in Shakespeare or in media studies, as well as in a wide range of cultural and literary courses.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Antony and Cleopatra as Logical Extension or Challenging Rewriting?
1
Performing Antony and Cleopatraas Julius Caesars Sequel
19
Cleopatra in an Intertextual Triangle of Desire
83
Cleopatra as the Pivotal Figure in the Conflation of Plots1
133
From Sequel to Remake and Parody
163
To Be and Not to Be a Sequel?
193
Some Films Based on the Figuresof Julius Caesar Cleopatraand Mark Antony
199
Bibliography
203
Index
213
About the Author
227
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Sarah Hatchuel is professor of early modern English literature and director of the Group of Research on Identity and Culture research centre at the University of Le Havre (France). She is the author of Shakespeare, from Stage to Screen and Shakespeare on Screen: The Roman Plays and she edited the plays Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra in the New Kittredge Shakespeare collection.

Bibliographic information