Shantiniketan: The Bolpur School of Rabindranath Tagore

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Macmillan, 1916 - Santiniketan (India) - 130 pages
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Page 66 - Having this ideal of a school in my mind which should be a home and a temple in one, where teaching should be a part of worshipful life I selected this spot, away from all distractions of town, hallowed with the memory of a pious life whose days were passed here in communion with God.
Page 65 - To give spiritual culture to our boys was my principal object in starting my school in Bolpur. Fortunately, in India we have the model before us in the tradition of our ancient forest schools where teachers whose aim was to realise their lives in God had their homes. The atmosphere was full of the aspiration for the infinite, and the students who grew up with their teachers closely united with them in spiritual relationship felt the reality of God — for it was no mere creed imposed upon them or...
Page 3 - Her mornings come and her evenings bringing down heaven's kisses, making us feel anew that she is our own, the darling of our hearts. The stillness of her shades is stirred by the woodland whisper; her amlaki groves are aquiver with the rapture of leaves. She dwells in us and around us, however far we may wander. She weaves...
Page 67 - ... the moon is up, in the rainy days when their classes are closed. Mornings and evenings fifteen minutes time is given them to sit in an open space composing their minds for worship. We never watch them and ask questions about what they think in those times but leave it entirely to themselves, to the spirit of the place and the time, and the suggestion of the practice itself. We rely more upon the subconscious influence of nature, of the association of the place and the daily life of worship that...
Page 9 - I seemed choked for breath in the hideous nightmare of our present time, meaningless in its petty ambitions of poverty, and felt in me the struggle of my motherland for awakening in spiritual emancipation. Our endeavours after political agitation seemed to me unreal to the core, and pitifully feeble in their utter helplessness. I felt that it is a blessing of providence that begging should be an unprofitable profession, and that only to him that hath shall be given. I said to myself that we must...
Page 12 - Fortunately for me, Satish Chandra Roy, a young student of great promise, who was getting ready for his BA degree, became attracted to my school and devoted his life to carry out my idea. He was barely nineteen, but he had a wonderful soul, living in a world of ideas, keenly responsive to all that was beautiful and great in the realm of nature and of human mind. He was a poet who would surely have taken his place among the immortals of world-literature if he had been spared to live, but he died when...
Page 126 - Tagore devotes much space to a consideration of him as a short story writer, advancing the opinion that this particular form of literature is one of the most important expressions of Tagore's genius. Now for the first time English readers are given the opportunity of acquainting themselves with this new Tagore and of forming their own estimate of him. None of the material in this volume has ever appeared before in English. The Stranger BY ARTHUR BULLARD (ALBERT EDWARDS) Author of" Comrade Yetta,
Page 4 - ... down heaven's kisses, making us feel anew that she is our own, the darling of our hearts. The stillness of her shades is stirred by the woodland whisper; her amlaki groves are aquiver with the rapture of leaves. She dwells in us and around us, however far we may wander. She weaves our hearts in a song, making us one in music...
Page 8 - ... thought and culture. These were questions which were with the poet and he came to the conclusion that the consummation of his own life lay only in a deeper realization of the true life of the spirit. The regeneration of his country would also come in the same way and by the same path. So he affirmed. In the modern time my turn has also come to dream of that age, towering above all ages of the subsequent history in the greatness of its simplicity and wisdom of pure life.. .our endeavours after...
Page 10 - I determined to do what I could to bring to the surface for our daily use and purification the stream of ideals that originated in the summit of our past, flowing underground in the depth of India's soil, — the ideals of simplicity of life, clarity of spiritual vision, purity of heart, harmony with the universe, and consciousness of the infinite personality in all creation.

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