Shantung Compound

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Harper Collins, May 28, 1975 - Religion - 272 pages
4 Reviews
This vivid diary of life in a Japanese internment camp during World War II examines the moral challenges encountered in conditions of confinement and deprivation.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - autumnesf - LibraryThing

An interesting book about whites interned in a camp in China during the China/Japanese war. Mostly about the author's thoughts on man and how he react's, etc. This was not a brutal compound and they had it fairly easy. An interesting read. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - seoulful - LibraryThing

The author, a young American teacher in China, is caught up into a large group of foreign internees of the Japanese during WWII and placed in a camp for a period of 2 1/2 years. Foreigners of every ... Read full review

Contents

Into the Unknown
1
Learning to Live
13
Eggs Guards and Love
37
Medicines and Recipes or How to Outwit Circumstances
52
A Place of Ones Own
75
A Mixed Blessing
96
Sugarand Politics
117
Threat of Anarchy
141
Saints Priests and Preachers
163
More Saints Priests and Preachers
177
Living for What?
193
Rescue from the Clouds
202
Last Days at Weihsien
214
After It Was All Over
223
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

Langdon Gilkey was a young American teacher at Yenching University near Peking, China, when the Japanese military under wartime pressure rounded up all foreigners into an internment camp. Two and a half years later they were released. Shantung Compound is based on a journal Dr. Gilkey kept during his imprisonment.

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