Shattered

Front Cover
Pan Books, 2001 - Detective and mystery stories - 295 pages
5 Reviews
When jockey Martin Stukely dies following a fall at Cheltenham, his friend Gerard Logan becomes embroiled in a perilous search for a stolen videotape. Logan, half artist, half artisan, is a glass blower on the verge of widespread acclaim for the originality and ingenuity of his work. Long accustomed to the frightful dangers inherent in molten glass and in maintaining a glass-making furnace at never less than eighteen hundred degrees Fahrenheit, Logan is suddenly faced with a series of unexpected and terrifying new threats to his business, his courage and his life. Believing the missing video tape to hold some sort of key to a priceless treasure, and wrongly convinced that Logan knows where to find it, a group of villains sets out to force from him the information he doesn't have. Narrowly escaping these attacks, Logan reckons that to survive he must himself find out the truth. The journey is thorny, and the final race to the tape throws more hurdles and more hazards in Logan's way than his dead jockey friend could ever have imagined. Glass shatters. Logan doesn't . . . but it's a close run thing.

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User Review  - themulhern - LibraryThing

Solid, if shallow, details about glassblowing. An extra half star because of its nice dedication to the queen mother on her 100th birthday. Not all there in terms of plot; the protagonist can flip a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - readafew - LibraryThing

This is the first Dick Francis book I've ever read. When my grandfather died I got a bunch of his books and among them were 10 or so Dick Francis books. He was one of my grandpa's favorite authors so ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
26
Section 3
53
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Dick Francis was born in Wales on October 31, 1920. Because his father was a professional steeplechase jockey and a stable manager, Francis grew up around horses, and after a stint as a pilot in the Royal Air Force during World War II, he became a steeplechase jockey himself, turning professional in 1948. He was named champion jockey of the 1953-54 racing season by the British National Hunt after winning more than 350 races and was retained as jockey to the queen mother for four seasons. When he retired from racing in 1957 at the age of 36, Francis went to work as a racing correspondent for the Sunday Express, a London paper, where he worked for 16 years. In the early sixties, he decided to combine his love of mysteries with his knowledge of the racing world, and published Dead Cert in 1962. Set mostly in the racing world, he has written more than 40 novels including Forfeit, Blood Sport, Slay-Ride, Odds Against, Flying Finish, Smoke Screen, High Stakes, and Long Shot. He wrote his last four books Dead Heat, Silks, Even Money, and Crossfire with his son Felix Francis. He has received numerous awards including the Silver Dagger award from Britain's Crime Writers Association for For Kicks, the Gold Dagger award for Whip Hand, the Diamond Dagger award in 1990, and three Edgar awards. He died on February 14, 2010 at the age of 89.

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