Sheep: Breeds and Management

Front Cover
Vinton, 1898 - Sheep - 235 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 56 - Downs, they are yet sui generis and distinct from any others, and may be considered peculiarly. his own: " About twenty-five years since, in forming my flock, I purchased the best Hampshire or West-Country Down ewes I could meet with; some of them I obtained from the late Mr. G. Budd, Mr. William Pain, Mr. Digweed, and other eminent breeders, giving 40s.
Page 82 - CHORUS. Ca' the yowes to the knowes, Ca' them where the heather grows, Ca' them where the burnie rows, My bonie dearie.
Page 68 - ... too small and short-coated. The owner formerly divided his flock into three parts, putting a half-bred ram to the ewes that were about right, a Cotswold to the small ones, and a Down to the coarser sheep.
Page 57 - I was informed that a Leicester ram was coupled to some of the largest Cotswold ewes, and the most robust of the produce were selected for use. The thought then struck me that my best plan would be to obtain a first-rate Sussex Down sheep to put to my larger Hampshire Down ewe, both being of the short-woolled breed.
Page 29 - In these woolds (Cotswold) they feed in great numbers flocks of sheep, long necked and square of bulk and bone, by reason (as is commonly thought) of the weally and hilly situation of their pasturage, whose wool, being most fine and soft, is held in passing great account amongst all nations.
Page 57 - I went down the next two years and selected for myself, but the stock did not suit my taste so well as the one he sent me, and I did not use them. I then commissioned him to send me his sheep which obtained the first prize at Liverpool ; and from these two sheep, the first -and the last, by marking the lambs of each tribe as they fall, then coupling them together at the third and fourth generation, my present flock was made.
Page 48 - ... &c., &c., and were not mature enough to fatten until three years old or past. Of his flock in 1794, Arthur Young* says : " Mr. Ellman's flock of sheep, I must observe in this place, is unquestionably the first in the country ; there is nothing that can be compared with it ; the wool is the finest and the carcass the best proportioned ; although I saw several noble flocks afterwards which I examined with a great degree of attention ; some few had very fine wool, which might be equal to his, but...
Page 55 - I have had my attention called to this fact frequently since I have ceased to be a breeder. How has this altered character been obtained ? Can we recognize none of the Cotswold fleece or his more symmetrical proportions? And, when I tell you that, in the years 1835-36 and subsequent years I sold very many half-bred rams, not only into Hampshire Down flocks generally, but into those of six or eight of our first ram- breeders whose names are at this day to be...
Page 55 - Yon must have observed an immense improvement in the character of the Hampshire sheep generally within the last fifteen or twenty years — an increase of size, a heavier fleece of a longer staple, with a kindlier touch, evidencing a greater aptitude to fatten. I have had my attention called to this fact frequently since I have ceased to be a breeder. How has this altered character been obtained ? Can we recognize none of the Cotswold fleece or his more symmetrical proportions?
Page 48 - Ellman'H flock of sheep is unquestionably the first in the country, the -wool the finest, and the carcasses the best proportioned. Both these valuable properties are united in the flock at Glynde. He has raised the merit of the breed by his unremitting attention, and it now stands unrivaled.

Bibliographic information