Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach

Front Cover
Apress, Nov 3, 2006 - Computers - 448 pages
When I was introduced to Unix in 1990, it was still the domain of multiuser systems and high-end workstations. Even the i386 system I started with had 12 users logging on concurrently through serial terminals. I had remote access through a blazingly fast 1200 bps modem. Things were changing by the mid-1990s, when systems using the Linux kernel, integrated with GNU utilities and the X Window System, provided a viable alternative to Microsoft Windows. At the same time, computers with the power, memory, and hard drive space to run it came within reach of an individual’s pocketbook. The Internet brought fast and efficient distribution of the new systems and software (and enabled their development in the first place). Unix had arrived on the home computer. The twenty-first century has seen the burgeoning of a new breed of Unix user: the home (or small business) user whose computer experience was previously limited, at most, to Microsoft Windows. Such computers may well be used by only one person. This modern user quite likely has no intention of becoming a system administrator, and just wants to use the computer with as little fuss as possible.
 

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Contents

C
8
String Briefs
61
Whats in a Word?
81
Scripting by Numbers
105
C
131
C
135
Treading a Righteous PATH
157
The Dating Game
165
Figure 151 The Toronto FreeNet membership database screen
304
d Delete current record
316
Home on the Web
323
Figure 161 Web page created by mkhtmlindex
336
Call the same program with options from the command
339
Taking Care of Business
345
2
355
Random Acts of Scripting
361

POP Goes the EMail
199
The output is in two sections The first lists all
225
A typical day sees between 100 and 200 messages deleted
227
More Than
229
The
251
Backing Up the Drive
279
Aging Archiving and Deleting
293
Covering All Your Databases
303
Figure 181 A roll offive dice
376
A Smorgasbord of Scripts
381
C
391
Script Development
397
C
405
Internet Scripting Resources
407
Copyright

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Page 7 - All keyword arguments are placed in the environment for a command, not just those that precede the command name. — n Read commands but do not execute them. — t Exit after reading and executing one command. — u Treat unset variables as an error when substituting. —v Print shell input lines as they are read. —x Print commands and their arguments as they are executed.

About the author (2006)

Chris F.A. Johnson was introduced to Unix in 1990 and learned shell scripting because there was no C compiler on the system. His first major project was a menu-driven, user-extensible database system with report generator. Chris uses the shell as his primary, general-purpose programming language, and his projects have included a member database, menuing system, and POP3 mail filtering and retrieval. Chris is the author of Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach (Apress, 2005). When not pushing shell scripting to the limit, he designs and codes web sites, teaches chess, and composes cryptic crosswords.

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