Shopgirl

Front Cover
Wheeler, 2001 - Fiction - 151 pages
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One of our country's most acclaimed and beloved entertainers, Steve Martin is recognized as a gorgeous writer capable of being at once melancholy and tart, achingly innocent and astonishingly ironic (Elle). Beautifully written, this novella reveals a different side of Martin, one that is unexpectedly perceptive about relationships and life and wise when it comes to the inner workings of the human heart.Mirabelle is a young woman, beautiful in a wallflower-ish kind of way, who works behind the glove counter at Neiman Marcus, selling things that nobody buys anymore. . . Slightly lost, very shy, Mirabelle charms because of all that she is not: Not glamorous, not aggressive, not self-aggrandizing. Still, there is something about her that is irresistible.Mirabelle captures the attention of Ray Porter, a wealthy, much older businessman. As they tentatively embark on a relationship, they both struggle to decipher the language of love -- with consequences that are both comic and heartbreaking. Filled with the kind of witty, discerning observations that have brought Steve Martin critical success, Shopgirl is a work of disarming tenderness.

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
23
Section 3
25
Copyright

15 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Steve Martin was born on August 14, 1945 in Waco, Texas. He studied at Long Beach State College. He has acted in such films as The Jerk; Roxanne; Planes, Trains and Automobiles; Bowfinger; Father of the Bride; Cheaper by the Dozen; and Shopgirl, which was adapted from a novel he wrote. He has won an Emmy for his comedy writing and Grammies for his comedy albums. He has made several appearances on The Tonight Show and Saturday Night Live. He has written several books including Shopgirl, Cruel Shoes, Pure Drivel, The Pleasure of My Company, and An Object of Beauty. He also wrote a play entitled Picasso at the Lapin Agile and a memoir entitled Born Standing Up. During the 1990s, he wrote various pieces for The New Yorker. In 2002, he adapted the Carl Sternheim play The Underpants, which ran Off-Broadway at Classic Stage Company and in 2008, co-wrote and produced Traitor. In 2013 he published a memoir entitled Born Standing Up: A Comic's Life. This book tells the story of his beginnings as a magician and comedian at a young age and follows through his career lifetime.

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