Showing Our Colors: Afro-German Women Speak Out

Front Cover
May Opitz, Katharina Oguntoye, Dagmar Schultz
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1992 - Social Science - 239 pages
0 Reviews
Precolonial images of Africa, colonialism, and fascism -- The Germans in the Colonies -- African and Afro-German women in the Weimar Republic and under National Socialism -- Our father was Cameroonian, our mother, East Prussian, we are mulattoes / Doris Reiprich and Erika Ngambi Ul Kuo -- An "occupation baby" in postwar Germany / Helga Emde -- "Aren't you glad you can stay here?" / Astrid Berger -- "Mirror the invisible, play the forgotten" / Miriam Goldschmidt -- Three Afro-German women in conversation with Dagmar Schultz / Laura Baum, Katharina Oguntoye, May Optiz[sic] -- "What makes me so different in the eyes of others?" / Ellen Wiedenroth -- Old Europe meets up with itself in a different place / Corinna N. -- "All of a sudden, I knew what I wanted" / Angelika Eisenbrandt -- "I do the same things that others do" / Julia Berger -- Mother: Afro-German, Father: Ghanaian / Abena Adomako -- The break / May Optiz[sic] -- What I've always wanted to tell you / Katharina Oguntoye -- "I never wanted to write, I just couldn't help myself" / Raya Lubinetzki.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The First Africans in Germany
3
Moors and White Christians
4
From Moors to Negroes
6
The Construction of a Concept
9
Sexism and Racism
11
Notes
15
The Germans in the Colonies
19
The Emigrants Sense of Mission
21
An Occupation Baby in Postwar Germany
101
Arent you glad you can stay here?
113
Mirror the invisible I Play the forgotten
119
Racism Here and Now
125
Everyday Racism in Books for Children and Youths
127
AfroGermans between SelfAssertion and SelfDenial
133
Identification and SelfValuation
140
The Inbetween World as Opportunity
141

German Women in the Colonies
27
Colonization of Consciousness through Mission and Education
30
The Colonial Heritage
34
Notes
37
African and AfroGerman Women in the Weimar Republic and under National Socialism
41
Black Rapists and Rhineland Bastards
44
Disgrace to the Race and Colonial Propaganda
49
Notes
53
Our Father Was Cameroonian Our Mother East Prussian We Are Mulattoes
56
The SoCalled Occupation Babies
77
A Digression on Race Terminology and Sexism
82
Scientific Studies on the Status of AfroGermans in the 19505
85
Notes
96
Notes
143
The First Exchange for This Book
145
What makes me so different in the eyes of others?
165
Old Europe Meets Up with Itself in a Different Place
178
All of a sudden I knew what I wanted
191
I do the same things that others do
196
AfroGerman Father Ghanaian
199
May Opitz age The Break
204
What Ive Always Wanted to Tell You
212
Recapitulation and Outlook
228
Translators Afterword
234
Literature and Addresses
238
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information