Siddhartha (Dual-Language)

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Courier Corporation, Sep 5, 2013 - Fiction - 208 pages
2733 Reviews
Nobel prize-winning author Hermann Hesse imagined life in India during the lifetime of the Buddha to create this memorable tale about a restless seeker of enlightenment. First published in 1922, Siddhartha employs powerful symbolism to impart its timeless teachings.
The story concerns a young Brahman who quits his comfortable home to join a roving group of holy men in striving to empty their hearts of passion and desire through self-denial and meditation. Discouraged by his failure to find Nirvana after three years of the strictest asceticism, the young seeker turns to the fleshly world, where he becomes a wealthy merchant and partakes of sensual pleasures with a sophisticated courtesan. Years of materialistic self-indulgence numb Siddhartha's soul, but at his moment of greatest despondency, he begins to experience his long-sought spiritual awakening. True enlightenment, he realizes, cannot be received from the lessons of others; it must be attained through individual struggle.
This handy dual-language edition — with its excellent line-for-line English translation on pages facing the original German text — offers students an outstanding opportunity to hone their German-language skills while discovering a literary classic.
 

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User Review  - ReluctantTechie - LibraryThing

Considered a classic, but very repetitive in English. Perhaps it is better in the original German. It touches on the paradoxes of life and is difficult to truly understand, which I guess is the point. Read full review

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User Review  - Razinha - LibraryThing

I seem to remember writing a book report for this in junior high or high school, but I don't recall that I ever actually read it. I wonder what the then me, being naive and impressionable, would have ... Read full review

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ZWEITERTEIL PART TWO Kamala Kamala
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About the author (2013)

Hermann Hesse (July 2, 1877 -- August 9, 1962) was a German poet, novelist, essayist and painter. His best-known works included Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game, each of which explores an individual's search for authenticity, self-knowledge and spirituality. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. Hess publicly announced his views on the savagery of World War I, and was considered a traitor. He moved to Switzerland where he eventually became a naturalized citizen. He warned of the advent of World War II, predicting that cultureless efficiency would destroy the modern world. His theme was usually the conflict between the elements of a person's dual nature and the problem of spiritual loneliness. His first novel, Peter Camenzind, was published in 1904. His masterpiece, Death and the Lover (1930), contrasts a scholarly abbot and his beloved pupil, who leaves the monastery for the adventurous world. Steppenwolf (1927), a European bestseller, was published when defeated Germany had begun to plan for another war. It is the story of Haller, who recognizes in himself the blend of the human and wolfish traits of the completely sterile scholarly project. During the 1960s Hesse became a favorite writer of the counter culture, especially in the United States, though his critical reputation has never equaled his popularity. Hermann Hesse died in 1962.

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