Signs of Science: Literature, Science, and Spanish Modernity Since 1868

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Purdue University Press, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 226 pages
Signs of Science: Literature, Science, and Spanish Modernity since 1868 traces how Spanish culture represented scientific activity from the mid-nineteenth century onward. The book combines the global perspective afforded by historical narrative with detailed rhetorical analyses of images of science in specific literary and scientific texts. As literary criticism it seeks to illuminate similarities and differences in how science and scientists are pictured; as cultural history it follows the course of a centuries-long dialogue about Spain and science.
 

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Contents

One Short Sentence The Spanish Reception of Darwinism
15
Pride and Natural Theology
17
The Introduction of Darwinism
25
Darwinism as Image
32
Decorative Science Pedants and Spanish Realism
49
Realists and Positivists
50
Reliable and Unreliable Representatives of Science
55
Scientific Spokespersons in Spanish Realism
57
Sublimity and Modern Epistemology
134
Science and Love Again in Galdos
139
Unamuno and Comical Science
142
Baroja and Tragic Science
147
Mecanopolis
152
Muy Siglo XX Science and Culture
154
Ortega and lo moderno
155
Ortega and Scientific Images
158

Images of Science in La Regenta
65
Science Faith and Reference
81
Ramon y Cajal and Biological Tropology
83
Faith in Words
93
Metaphysics and Modernity
100
Perspectivas tan vastas Scientific Images of Science
103
Metaphors and Science
106
The Poetics of Scientific Popularization
108
Cajals Scientific Rhetoric
115
The Scientific Value of Anthropomorphism
125
Rhetoric and Progress
130
The Tragicomedy of Science in 1898
132
Ortega and Evolution
161
Ortega and Relativity
169
A Scientific Humanist
172
History and Medicine
174
Franco and Science
176
An Unscientific Solution
181
Conclusion
183
Notes
187
Works Cited
203
Index
219
Copyright

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Page 19 - MY opinion of Astronomy has always been, that it is not the best medium through which to prove the agency of an intelligent Creator; but that, this being proved, it shows, beyond all other sciences, the magnificence of his operations.

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