Silencing the Queen: The Literary Histories of Shelamzion and Other Jewish Women

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Mohr Siebeck, 2006 - Religion - 315 pages
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Tal Ilan explores the way historical documents from antiquity are reworked and edited in a long process that ends in silencing the women originally mentioned in them. Many methods are used to produce this end result: elimination of women or their words, denigration of the women and their role or unification of several significant women into one. These methods and others are illuminated in this book, as it uses the example of the Jewish queen Shelamzion Alexandra (76-67 BCE) for its starting point. Queen Shelamzion was the only legitimate Jewish queen in history. Yet all the documents in which she is mentioned (Josephus, Qumran scrolls, rabbinic literature etc.) have been reworked so as to minimize her significance and distort the picture we may receive of her. Tal Ilan follows the ways this was done and in doing so she encounters similar patterns in which other Jewish women in antiquity were silenced, censored and edited out.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Multiple Forms of Silencing
19
Shelamzion Alexandra A Silenced Queen
35
A King not a Queen The Principle of Dynastic
43
with Judah Aristobulus Widow
50
The Whore of Nineveh Queen Shelamzion in the Eyes
61
Women Pharisees
73
1617 A Woman Haver
97
4 14d bAvodah Zarah 28a
167
526cbKetubbot22a
180
4 6c bBerakhot 22a
188
Conclusions
197
You Shall not Suffer a Witch to Live Witches in Ancient
214
The Social Paradigm of the WitchHunt
223
Jesus and Jewish Women Healers
242
In the Queens Name
259

Womens Rights Tosefta vs Mishnah
111
The Bavli and Yerushalmi on Patriarchy
121
Aqiva and Ishmael on Womens Inheritance
138
Historical Conclusions
147
Stolen Water is Sweet Yerushalmi vs Bavli
160

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About the author (2006)

Tal Ilan, Born 1956; 1991 PhD on Jewish Women in Greco-Roman Palestine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem; since 2003 Professor for Jewish Studies at the Freie Universitat, Berlin.

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