Simple stories for children

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Contents

I
9
II
17
III
25
IV
31
V
43
VI
55
VII
69
VIII
87

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Page 31 - They shall all bloom in fields of light, Transplanted by my care ; And saints upon their garments white These sacred blossoms wear.
Page 93 - THE Son of God in doing good Was fain to look to Heaven and sigh : And shall the heirs of sinful blood Seek joy unmix'd in charity? God will not let Love's work impart Full solace, lest it steal the heart; Be thou content in tears to sow, Blessing, like Jesus, in thy woe...
Page 125 - Sixpence each. Every volume contains one or more Tales complete, is strongly bound in cloth boards, with four coloured engravings on wood, designed and engraved by Dalziel Brothers, and 124 pages of clear, bold letter-press, printed upon stout paper. The Tales are written by various Authors, most of them expressly for the Series, and for cheapness, attractiveness, and sterling interest, they present, perhaps, one of the most pleasing and useful collections of Stories in modern Juvenile Literature.
Page 91 - The trivial round, the common task, Will furnish all we ought to ask; Room to deny ourselves; a road To bring us daily nearer God.
Page 126 - Prince Arthur ; or, The Four Trials. By Catherine Mary Stirling. And TALES BY THE FLOWERS.
Page 87 - IT surely is a wasted heart — It is a wasted mind — That seeks not in the inner world Its happiness to find : For happiness is like the bird That broods above its nest, And finds beneath its folded wings Life's dearest and its best.
Page 125 - One Shilling and Sixpence each. Every volume contains one or more Tales complete, is strongly bound in cloth boards, with four coloured engravings on wood, designed and engraved by Dalziel Brothers, and 124 pages of clear, bold letter-press, printed upon stout paper. The...
Page 43 - Peaceful are and lowly Ye are Saints, and ye must be Worthy of such company. Give not back the hasty blow. Though 'tis given wrongly; Let the foolish scoffer go, Though he tempt thee strongly; Keep thy gentle Lord in mind, Who was always meek and kind. He gave back no angry word, When they did offend Him; He that was the Angels' Lord, Called none to defend Him, Not when hated and abused, Scorned, and spitted on, and bruised.
Page 9 - ... thy sins, Done through the busy day ; Then call to mind thy brother's wrong, To strife by angry passions driven, And in thy heart forgive him all, As thou would'st be forgiven. Go, throw thy little arms around His neck, and kiss him tenderly, Nor turn away with pouting lip, And sullen tearful eye. Thou hast sinned more against thy GOD, Than ever brother sinned to thee ; If He should turn away His face, How wretched would'st thou be.

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