Sir John Franklin: Expeditions to Destiny

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Heritage House Publishing Co, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 140 pages

After Royal Navy captain Sir John Franklin disappeared in the Arctic in 1846 while seeking the Northwest Passage, the search for his two ships, Erebus and Terror, and survivors of his expedition became one of the most exhaustive quests of the 19th century. Despite tantalizing clues, the ships were never found, and the fate of Franklin's expedition passed into legend as one of the North's great and enduring mysteries.

Anthony Dalton explores the eventful and fascinating life of this complex and intelligent man, beginning with his early sea voyages and arduous overland explorations in the Arctic. After years in Malta and Tasmania, Franklin realized his dream of returning to the Far North; it would be his last expedition. Drawing from evidence found by 19th-century Arctic explorers following in Franklin's footsteps and investigations by 20th-century historians and archaeologists, Dalton retraces the route of the lost ships and recounts the sad tale of Franklin, his officers and men in their final agonizing months.

 

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Contents

prologue
9
introduction
12
The Boy Sailor
16
To the Arctic
26
Rivers Muskeg and Waterfalls
34
The Spectre of Cannibalism
49
Overland to the Polar Sea Again
59
A Rainbow in the Mediterranean
70
Somewhere in the Arctic
94
An Expedition Disappears
101
Where is Franklin?
108
The Answers Begin to Emerge
118
epilogue
128
selected bibliography
136
index
138
acknowledgements
140

Governor of Van Diemens Land
76
To the Northwest Passage
85

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About the author (2012)

Anthony Dalton is the author of numerous books on maritime history including The Graveyard of the Pacific , The Fur-Trade Fleet , Alone against the Arctic , and Sir John Franklin . He is a fellow of both the Royal Geographical Society and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society and is past-president of the Canadian Authors Association. He lives in Tsawwassen, British Columbia.

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