Sixth Grade Secrets

Front Cover
Scholastic Incorporated, 1987 - Juvenile Fiction - 201 pages
From the Newbery-award winning author of Holes

When Laura Sibbie starts a secret club at school, makes the other members them give her something totally embarrassing as "insurance," to make sure they don't tell anyone else about the club. She promises to keep the insurance secret, unless someone blabs. Gabriel, who never tells on anybody, would be a perfect member of Pig City. He wants to join, too. But when Laura asks him, something goes terribly wrong. Now there are two secret clubs in Mr. Doyle's class, and guess who's the head of the new one-Gabriel! Each club is determined to topple the other, and nobody's secrets are safe.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - annhepburn - LibraryThing

This is one of those forever rereads. Originally titled Sixth Grade Secrets, I first read it when I was that age, and it (like the rest of Sachar's books) stands the test of time. He writes so ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

A school story with a measure of poignancy & intensity between Sidewise Stories from Wayside School and Holes. Still, it's Sachar, so with the insights there's also plenty of humor: On Sunday, she ... Read full review

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References to this book

Louis Sachar
Meg Greene
Limited preview - 2004

About the author (1987)

Louis Sachar was born in East Meadow, New York on March 20, 1954. He attended the University of California, at Berkeley. During his senior year, he helped out at Hillside Elementary School. It was his experience there that led to his first book, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, written in 1976. After college, he worked for a while in a sweater warehouse in Norwalk, Connecticut before attending Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where he graduated in 1980. Sideways Stories from Wayside School was accepted for publication during his first week of law school. He worked part-time as a lawyer for eight years before becoming a full-time writer in 1989. His other works include There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, the Marvin Redpost books, Fuzzy Mud, and Holes, which won the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and was made into a major motion picture.

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